jump to article
AFB American Foundation
for the Blind
TM  
   
  200 Years: The Life and Legacy of Louis Braille

Portable Braille Writer, no date.

View Larger Image and Description

Recognition of the Braille Code
Dissemination of Braille

After Louis' death in 1852, the braille code, the code he invented as a teenager, spread throughout the world. In 1878, a congress met in Paris and officially decided to adopt braille as the international system used for writing by the blind. However, this did not put an end to the use of multiple systems of embossed writing. In the United States, braille was first used in 1854 by the Missouri School for the Blind, but it took until 1917 for the United States to agree upon a braille standard. Up until then, competing systems of Boston Line Type, Moon Type, American Braille, British Braille, and New York Point were all used.

It was not until 1932 that a uniform code was accepted by English-speaking countries around the world.


Right-Arrow Go To Next Frame

Left-Arrow Go To Previous Frame
Changing of the Guard
Braille's Code Demonstrated
The Final Years of Louis Braille
Dissemination of Braille
France Honors Its Native Son
Helen Keller in Paris


Braille Galleries:
Introduction
Introduction
Coupvray
Coupvray
Paris
Paris
Braille
Braille
Recognition
Recognition

View All Media Galleries    Right-Arrow Go To Next Gallery   Left-Arrow Go To Previous Gallery

Celebrating 200 Years of Braille


Change Colors | Home
Introduction | Coupvray | Paris | Braille | Recognition

Images and content are copyright © 2009, American Foundation for the Blind.
For information on reproducing material from our web site, please contact afbinfo@afb.net.