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  Anne Sullivan Macy: Miracle Worker

Handwritten letter from Helen Keller, circa 1887

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Anne as Teacher (1886-1904)
The Power of Words

After Helen's breakthrough in understanding the meaning of words, she moved ahead with amazing speed. Within three weeks, she had learned more than 100 words. Anne taught her as one would teach a young child. "I shall assume that she has the normal child's capacity of assimilation and imitation. I shall use complete sentences in talking to her." Anne took all she had learned at Perkins about teaching a deaf-blind child and adapted her knowledge to produce a more natural way of teaching. Many of Helen's lessons were outdoors. Anne realized that this deaf-blind child could learn much using her three remaining senses of touch, smell, and taste:

It is wonderful how words generate ideas! Every new word Helen learns seems to carry with it the necessity for many more. Her mind grows through its ceaseless activity.

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Governess Wanted in Alabama
Teaching Helen
The Power of Words
Anne's Letters to Sophia Hopkins
Early Fame
Teaching Helen Keller How to Speak
Anne's Educational Philosophy
Alexander Graham Bell
Lines of Communication
Radcliffe College
You Must Train Teachers


ASM Galleries:
Introduction
Introduction
Formative Years
Formative Years
Teacher
Teacher
Wrentham
Wrentham
Trouble
Trouble
Legacy
Legacy

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