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  Anne Sullivan Macy: Miracle Worker

Page from a Wonder Woman comic book, circa 1945

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Anne's Final Years (1930-1936) and Her Legacy
Foolish Remarks of a Foolish Woman

Anne was cremated and her ashes were laid to rest in the National Cathedral in Washington, D.C. She was the first woman to be given this honor on her own merits. The momentous nature and irony of this would not have been lost on her. The daughter of poor Irish immigrants, whose life involved so much hardship and who fought to be heard and to have others listen to her as an advocate for the blind, was ultimately honored in such a celebrated way.

Moreover, Anne saw her role as secondary to Helen's and remained skeptical about her own legacy. However, she became very much a part of American popular culture. The image seen here appeared in a 1945 Wonder Woman comic book and her life continues to provide material for plays and films such as The Miracle Worker, which are performed and shown around the globe. It is Anne Sullivan Macy and not Helen Keller who was the focus of The Miracle Worker, the most well-known adaptation of the story of Helen's young life.

Anne addressed the subject of fame in sayings that she wrote entitled Foolish Remarks of a Foolish Woman:

I have met a number of famous men uneventfully, but I have learned something about them. They are Human like the rest of us, they are not gods or even sacred cows as their biographers would have us believe. This is most comforting to those of us who are not famous. If scientists become masters of the world, as they are in a fair way to do, life will still go on; for men will still be jealous, quarrelsome and absurd.


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Academic Recognition
Education in the Light of Present-Day Knowledge and Need
Friends in High Places
A Woman of Many Talents
Death of Anne Sullivan Macy
Foolish Remarks of a Foolish Woman
National Women's Hall of Fame


ASM Galleries:
Introduction
Introduction
Formative Years
Formative Years
Teacher
Teacher
Wrentham
Wrentham
Trouble
Trouble
Legacy
Legacy

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