Skip to Content

AFBAmerican Foundation®
for the Blind

Expanding possibilities for people with vision loss

Archive

The American Foundation for the Blind's blogs focus on broadening access to technology, employment issues for people who are blind or visually impaired, advocacy on behalf of Americans with vision loss, raising children with disabilities, and more.


AFB Blog

The American Foundation for the Blind is a national organization expanding possibilities for people with vision loss. AFB experts can be found on Capitol Hill ensuring children have the educational materials they need to learn; in board rooms working with technology companies to ensure that their products are fully accessible; and at conferences ensuring professionals who work with people with vision loss have access to the latest research and information. Through our online resources and information center we communicate directly with people experiencing vision loss, and their families, to give them the resources they need to maintain an independent lifestyle. Follow AFB's blog to learn more about our activities.

  • Simple Accommodations Can Improve Workplace Safety for All
    by AFB Staff on 8/3/2017

    The Washington Post reports that the U.S. workplace accident death rate is higher for older workers. In the article, however, they also cite Ruth Finkelstein, co-director of Columbia University’s Aging Center, who cautioned against stereotyping. She said older people have a range of physical and mental abilities and that it’s

  • Sharing Our Progress in Making the Helen Keller Archive a Gold Standard of Accessibility for Other Digital Archives
    by Helen Selsdon on 7/28/2017

    We were so honored today to present at the Society of American Archivists 2017 Annual Meeting to discuss the Helen Keller Archive digitization project, and our work to create a

  • American Foundation for the Blind and 74 National Disability Organizations Strongly Oppose Revised Better Care Reconciliation Act
    by AFB Staff on 7/25/2017

    We join with members of the Consortium for Citizens with Disabilities (CCD) in strongly opposing the revised Better Care Reconciliation Act (BCRA). While we have serious concerns about many provisions of the BCRA, including a new provision that would dramatically increase costs for people with preexisting conditions, we cannot overstate the danger facing the millions of adults and children with disabilities if the bill’s Medicaid proposals are adopted by the Senate. The bill’s imposition of a per capita cap and the effective end of the adult Medicaid expansion would cut federal support by $756 billion by 2026, decimating a program that for decades has provided essential healthcare and long term services and supports to millions of adults and children with disabilities. Some


CareerConnect Blog

AFB CareerConnect® is an employment information resource developed by the American Foundation for the Blind for job seekers who are blind or visually impaired. The CareerConnect Blog focuses on employment issues for people who are blind or visually impaired, as well as sharing stories from mentors and other blind people who have found career success.

  • Paying for College As a Student Who Is Visually Impaired
    by Alicia Wolfe on 8/16/2017

    When you hear the words college education, do you automatically think cha-ching? It’s quite normal to associate dollar signs with attending a post-secondary institution, especially as the costs of a college education continue to rise in our country. Unfortunately, many teenagers and adults with vision loss often assume college is not an affordable option for them to pursue. Have you made the same assumption for yourself? If so, I encourage you to reconsider. Attending college or career school may be more affordable than you think. The reality is there are many resources available to assist you as a student with vision loss for paying

  • Introducing the Transition to College: Program Activity Guide for Students with Visual Impairments
    by Alicia Wolfe on 8/10/2017

    Across the nation, it’s a critical time of the year for teachers of students with visual impairments and other professionals responsible for providing services to students who are blind or visually impaired. We are actively engaged in a state of preparation and planning for our students as they begin their journeys into the new school year. Not only are we responsible for teaching and supporting students with visual impairments in learning the skills needed to have a successful school year (academically and socially), but we are also preparing them to be future employees in the workforce. In 2016, the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics reported people with a disability are less likely to have completed a bachelor’s degree or higher than those people with no disability. In

  • Pounding the Rock for Blind and Visually Impaired Job Seekers
    by Steve Cardenas on 8/9/2017

    When nothing seems to help, I go and look at a stonecutter hammering away at his rock perhaps a hundred times without as much as a crack showing in it. Yet, at the hundred and first blow, it will split in two, and I know it was not that blow that did it, but all that had gone before. Jacob Riis (1849-1914) This quote is displayed in the San Antonio Spurs dressing room. Down here in South Texas, the head coach, Gregg Popovich, is known for his pounding the rock mindset and culture he created in the Spurs locker room. It is not Popovich’s quote though. It comes from a book he read during the 1990s. The quote belongs to Jacob Riis, a staunch proponent of immigration rights and decent living conditions in New York during the late 1800s.


Other Blogs From the American Foundation for the Blind


FamilyConnect: A Parent's Voice

This blog is for you—parents of children with visual impairments. We talk about what it's like to be a parent, how to advocate for your child, what new resources we've found, and much more. FamilyConnect also periodically invites experts in all different aspects of raising a visually impaired child to make themselves available to answer your questions.


Raising a Child Who Is Blind and...

I am the mother of three and my middle child, Eddie, is officially the "Special Needs Child." Here is my blog to share the joy and pain of having such a unique child.


Visually Impaired: Now What?

Formerly known as the "Peer Perspectives Blog," we have renamed the blog to reflect the purpose more accurately. The posts are written by our team of peer advisors, many of whom are professionals in the field who are blind or visually impaired. The blog features solutions for living with visual impairment resulting from eye conditions such as macular degeneration, glaucoma, diabetic retinopathy, and retinitis pigmentosa. It includes posts about living independently, getting around, low vision, technology, cooking, and helpful products.