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AFBAmerican Foundation®
for the Blind

Expanding possibilities for people with vision loss

Browse By Topic: Employment

The American Foundation for the Blind's blogs focus on broadening access to technology, employment issues for people who are blind or visually impaired, advocacy on behalf of Americans with vision loss, raising children with disabilities, and more.


AFB Blog

The American Foundation for the Blind is a national organization expanding possibilities for people with vision loss. AFB experts can be found on Capitol Hill ensuring children have the educational materials they need to learn; in board rooms working with technology companies to ensure that their products are fully accessible; and at conferences ensuring professionals who work with people with vision loss have access to the latest research and information. Through our online resources and information center we communicate directly with people experiencing vision loss, and their families, to give them the resources they need to maintain an independent lifestyle. Follow AFB's blog to learn more about our activities.

  • February Is Age-Related Macular Degeneration (AMD) Month
    by AFB Staff on 2/24/2015

    Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is the leading cause of vision loss for people aged 60 and older in the United States. According to the American Academy of Ophthalmology (AAO), 10-15 million individuals have AMD and about 10% of those affected have the "wet" type of age-related macular degeneration. If you or someone you love has been diagnosed with age-related macular degeneration, here is just a small sampling of resources from the American Foundation for the Blind to help you cope with this condition.

  • "Helen Keller In Her Story" Oscar Winner 1955
    by Helen Selsdon on 2/20/2015

    Sixty years ago, Helen Keller was given an honorary Oscar as inspiration for the movie Helen Keller in Her Story a documentary by Nancy Hamilton about her life; she turned 75 that year and had spent 6 decades fighting for those with vision loss. Decades earlier, in 1916 she delivered an address on the Midland Chautauqua Circuit in which she said: I, for one, love strength, daring, fortitude. I do not want people to kill the fight in them; I want them to fight for right things. And that she most certainly did! In addition to her work for those with visual impairments, Helen

  • Helen Keller: A Champion Among Presidents
    by Helen Selsdon on 2/12/2015

    "Only people count. Only people who think and feel and work together make civilization. Only governments that keep every door of opportunity wide open are civilized governments...Civilization means a fair chance to live. It means an equitable share of the resources of the earth for every one. It means health and freedom and education for all men." <div


CareerConnect Blog

AFB CareerConnect® is an employment information resource developed by the American Foundation for the Blind for job seekers who are blind or visually impaired. The CareerConnect Blog focuses on employment issues for people who are blind or visually impaired, as well as sharing stories from mentors and other blind people who have found career success.

  • Pay Periods, Withholdings, and Deductions, Oh My! A Tool for Teaching Basic Tax Information to Teens with Visual Impairments
    by Shannon Carollo on 2/25/2015

    The 2015 tax season is upon us. I can't think of a better time of year to begin teaching tax terms and principles to your students, teens, or consumers who are blind or visually impaired. As April 15th draws near, all will hear the related buzz words: taxes, tax day, tax refund, withholdings, and deductions. Give your students the gift of being in-the-know, while preparing them for their first of many contributions to Uncle Sam: the first paycheck. Saving you time and energy, we have written the lesson plan for you. Check out CareerConnect's

  • When to Say “No” at Work as a Person who is Blind or Visually Impaired
    by Shannon Carollo on 2/24/2015

    I read an article this week regarding the importance of saying “No.” Yikes, guilty as charged, over here. I don’t know about you, but too often I give an instant yes, and slowly grow resentful. I feel resentful that I was even asked to perform such an “enormous favor” for a friend or acquaintance. In actuality, I should feel irritated at myself for saying “Yes”, when I really wanted to say “No.” It’s a “passive person” problem, and I’m over it. I’ve got the book Boundaries on my nightstand, and this year is all about healthy, assertive communication. But, when is it acceptable to say “No” at work?

  • Counting Down to Graduation: February: Finding the Right Job, Part 2
    by Katy Lewis on 2/19/2015

    Question: Is there anyone who can give me advice about finding the right job for me? So you’ve started your career search, but you want something more than numbers and stories. Why not connect with a mentor? Why not try networking?! Networking is an excellent way to open up new opportunities, but it can also help you figure out if the career you are interested in is really what you had in mind. Sometimes the best way to learn about a career is to talk to someone who is currently working in that field. This is where having a mentor comes in handy. Mentors have firsthand knowledge of what it takes


Other Blogs From the American Foundation for the Blind


FamilyConnect: A Parent's Voice

Featuring Susan LaVenture, NAPVI president, this blog is for you—parents of children with visual impairments. Susan talks about what it's like to be a parent, how to advocate for your child, what new resources she's found, and much more. FamilyConnect also periodically invites experts in all different aspects of raising a visually impaired child to make themselves available to answer your questions.


Raising a Child Who is Blind and...

I am the mother of three and my middle child, Eddie, is officially the "Special Needs Child." Here is my blog to share the joy and pain of having such a unique child.


Raising James: Multiply Disabled, Low-Vision, Adorable

My name is Anne and this is my blog. I am a mother of elementary-age boy-girl twins and wife to Daniel. The main reason I am writing this blog is that my son is legally blind, in addition to having other disabilities, and I want other parents and members of NAPVI and FamilyConnect to know they're not alone.


Peer Perspectives on Living with Vision Loss

VisionAware's peer advisors share their suggestions on living with visual impairment resulting from eye conditions such as macular degeneration, glaucoma, and diabetic retinopathy. Find out living independently, getting around, low vision, cooking, and helpful products.