Skip to Content

AFBAmerican Foundation®
for the Blind

Expanding possibilities for people with vision loss

Browse By Topic: Technology

The American Foundation for the Blind's blogs focus on broadening access to technology, employment issues for people who are blind or visually impaired, advocacy on behalf of Americans with vision loss, raising children with disabilities, and more.


AFB Blog

The American Foundation for the Blind is a national organization expanding possibilities for people with vision loss. AFB experts can be found on Capitol Hill ensuring children have the educational materials they need to learn; in board rooms working with technology companies to ensure that their products are fully accessible; and at conferences ensuring professionals who work with people with vision loss have access to the latest research and information. Through our online resources and information center we communicate directly with people experiencing vision loss, and their families, to give them the resources they need to maintain an independent lifestyle. Follow AFB's blog to learn more about our activities.

  • Reflections of a First-Time Attendee at the Web For All Conference
    by Elizabeth Neal on 4/21/2016

    Crista Earl, AFB's Director of Web Operations, and I were excited to attend the Web For All (W4A) Conference this year, in Montreal, Canada to share information about the AFB Accessible Video Player. Web accessibility is an important part of our work at the American Foundation for the Blind. We are committed to making our website and all of our productsfrom

  • Four Ways Google Is Building a More Accessible World for the Visually Impaired
    by AFB Staff on 4/20/2016

    On the heels of major accessibility announcements from Twitter and Facebook, tech giant Google recently highlighted its own efforts to build a more inclusive world for people with disabilities. Here are four ways Google is working to improve the lives of people who are blind or visually impaired: 1.

  • Happy 150th Anniversary Anne Sullivan Macy!
    by Helen Selsdon on 4/13/2016

    Dear Annie, Happy birthday! Today, we celebrate your legacy and excellence as an educator. You insisted that your student, Helen Keller, could learn and accomplish just as much as any seeing and hearing child could and you were right. You were a tough teacher when Helen misspelled a word in an essay or letter, you made her rewrite the entire text but you also had a finely tuned insight into a child’s psychology. You instantly recognized that Helen was a very bright child who just needed the tools to communicate with the world around her. You were critical of the conventional teaching methods of your day.


CareerConnect Blog

AFB CareerConnect® is an employment information resource developed by the American Foundation for the Blind for job seekers who are blind or visually impaired. The CareerConnect Blog focuses on employment issues for people who are blind or visually impaired, as well as sharing stories from mentors and other blind people who have found career success.

  • Where Are They Now? Visually Impaired Nurse and Blogger, Audrey Demmitt
    by Katy Lewis on 4/28/2016

    If you are a frequent follower of AFB blogs, you probably have heard of Audrey Demmitt, VisionAware peer advisor and blogger extraordinaire. But did you know that Audrey worked as a nurse for 30 years before she became a writer? Better yet, did you know that Audrey is also a mentor of AFB CareerConnect? In honor of the upcoming National Nurses Week, we decided to take some time this month to learn more about Audrey to see how she is inspiring others through her continued workplace and personal success. Check out this preview of

  • Nurses with Disabilities Have Great Abilities, Part One
    by Detra Bannister on 4/26/2016

    Are you interested in pursuing a career in healthcare? Pursuing your dream job can be an arduous process, but it is one that can really pay off in the end. But what if you are visually impaired? Or what if you develop vision loss during your pursuit? No matter your visual impairment, you have to believe in yourself. With enough hard work and motivation, you can achieve your goals. Nurses with Disabilities Have Great Abilities by Detra Bannister For some odd reason when I was growing up I never thought about nurses or doctors being sick or having disabilities. I guess their association with treating the sick and

  • We Discuss the Importance of Excellent Social Skills As a Person Who Is Blind or Visually Impaired, But What if We’re Quiet? (Hint: Quiet Is Highly Valuable)
    by Shannon Carollo on 4/25/2016

    Who else loves Ted Talks? I suppose listening to them is a hobby for me. Now, having recently read Quiet: The Power of Introverts in a World That Can't Stop Talking by Susan Cain, I was eager to watch her Ted Talk: The Power of Introverts. In her book and Ted Talk she explains that Americans (unfortunately) tend to praise and value extroverts over introverts. I agree; we esteem animated, charming, and boisterous people. In my opinion, we


Other Blogs From the American Foundation for the Blind


FamilyConnect: A Parent's Voice

Featuring Susan LaVenture, NAPVI president, this blog is for you—parents of children with visual impairments. Susan talks about what it's like to be a parent, how to advocate for your child, what new resources she's found, and much more. FamilyConnect also periodically invites experts in all different aspects of raising a visually impaired child to make themselves available to answer your questions.


Raising a Child Who is Blind and...

I am the mother of three and my middle child, Eddie, is officially the "Special Needs Child." Here is my blog to share the joy and pain of having such a unique child.


Visually Impaired: Now What?

Formerly known as the "Peer Perspectives Blog," we have renamed the blog to reflect the purpose more accurately. The posts are written by our team of peer advisors, many of whom are professionals in the field who are blind or visually impaired. The blog features solutions for living with visual impairment resulting from eye conditions such as macular degeneration, glaucoma, diabetic retinopathy, and retinitis pigmentosa. It includes posts about living independently, getting around, low vision, technology, cooking, and helpful products.