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AFBAmerican Foundation®
for the Blind

Expanding possibilities for people with vision loss

Paul Schroeder

Vice President, Programs and Policy Group

Photo of Paul Schroeder

Areas of Expertise:

  • AFB's national efforts and programs
  • Public policy and legislation relating to visual impairment
  • Technology

As vice president of Programs and Policy, Paul Schroeder oversees all of AFB's national programmatic efforts in aging, education, employment, literacy, and technology, as well as AFB's public policy and research agendas. Schroeder is intimately involved in AFB's technology initiatives, including efforts to encourage the development of mainstream products and services that are accessible for people who are blind or have low vision.

Schroeder also collaborates with other organizations working on policy matters in the field of blindness and visual impairment. He is regularly called upon to provide input on a variety of issues to governmental agencies, private industry, and nonprofit organizations. His policy expertise and activities include the areas of telecommunications and technology policy, vocational rehabilitation, education, and public health. Schroeder is also the senior contributing editor for AccessWorld: Technology for Consumers with Visual Impairments, published by AFB Press.

Prior to joining AFB, Schroeder served for three years as director of governmental affairs for the American Council of the Blind in Washington, DC, and as the special projects coordinator for the Governor's Office of Advocacy for People with Disabilities in Columbus, OH. While in Columbus, he served on the Board of Directors for the Central Ohio Radio Reading Service, which provides information to individuals unable to read newspapers and other print periodicals.

Schroeder earned his B.A. in political science and international studies from American University in Washington, DC.


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