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for the Blind

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1907-1941: Outlook for the Blind

Volume 1 * Number 1

April 1907 marked the inaugural issue of Outlook for the Blind, "a quarterly record of the progress and welfare of the blind," published by Massachusetts Association for Promoting the Interests of the Blind. The founding editor was Charles F. F. Campbell. A yearly subscription cost $.50, and the cost of a single issue was 15 cents. This issue featured the first contribution to the journal by Helen Keller, an essay entitled, "The Heaviest Burden on the Blind."

A portion of Helen Keller's essay
A portion of Helen Keller's essay entitled,
"The Heaviest Burden on the Blind."


Volume 3 * Number 3

The October 1909 issue featured a centerfold photograph of the delegates and representatives of the 10th Convention of American Association of Workers for the Blind (AAWB), which took place in Columbus, Ohio. This issue also marked the first instance of advertisements in the journal—one page of advertisements for tar and concrete, nonleaking fountain pens, "chapeaux" or hats, and clothing alterations and sewing.

The delegates and representatives of the 10th Convention of American Association of Workers for the Blind
Delegates and representatives of the 10th Convention of American Association of Workers for the Blind.


Advertisements from 1912 issue of Outlook
Advertisements for a broad range of products appeared in Outlook.
Those depicted here are from the year 1912.



Children playing with toys at Perkins School for the Blind.
Outlook routinely dedicated whole sections to descriptions and photographs of schools for the blind. This photo, from 1914, shows schoolchildren from Perkins School for the Blind.


Titania asleep guarded by her fairy attendants in A Midsummer Night's Dream at Overbrook, Pennsylvania.
This photograph is from a production of Shakespeare's A Midsummer Night's Dream presented at Overbrook School for the Blind in 1914.


Volume 11 * Number 2

The July 1917 issue included a listing of "Who's Who Among Workers for the Blind in America: Encyclopedia of Biography of Men and Women with Institutions and Other Agencies Devoted to the Interests of the Blind and the Prevention of Blindness."


A listing of 'Who's Who.'
Who's Who Among Workers for the Blind in America:
Encyclopedia of Biography of Men and Women with Institutions and Other Agencies Devoted to the Interests of the Blind and the Prevention of Blindness.


Volume 12 * Number 3

The October 1917 issue offered the journal's first research study, "Report of a Preliminary Test of the Reading of the Pupils of the Pennsylvania Institution for the Instruction of the Blind at Overbrook, PA." Written by Samuel P. Hayes--director of psychological research for Perkins School for the Blind, who created the first psychological testing tool for measuring the mental ability of children with visual impairment--the study explored reading rates of blind versus sighted children, and contained hand-drawn charts and tables, and line graphs.

Graph from Hayes's research study
Graph from Hayes's research study


Volume 13 * Number 2

The July 1919 issue offered a reprint of the journal's first exploration of individuals blinded in warfare, "How Shall I Learn to Teach the Blind Soldiers."

A two-photo spread showing men blinded in warfare running in a competitive race (above) and threshing a field (below).
A two-photo spread showing men blinded in warfare.


Women with visual impairment at work.
Women with visual impairment at work.


Volume 16 * Number 1

The April 1922 issue marked the first Annual Meeting of American Foundation for the Blind (AFB). The journal also outlined the offerings of the recently formed Hadley Correspondence School for the Blind.

William A. Hadley
William A. Hadley


Volume 16 * Number 2

The Summer 1922 issue featured the first annual report on braille transcribing.

School children with visual impairment and an elephant.
School children with visual impairment and an Asian elephant named "Tip."


Volume 17 * Number 1

The May 1923 issue of Outlook bid farewell to its retiring first editor in chief and founding editor, Charles F. F. Campbell. This issue also marked the establishment of permanent headquarters in New York City for the publisher of the journal, AFB, and featured a full-color illustration, entitled "Lifting the Veil of Darkness," on the cover.

First color cover of Outlook for the Blind.
First color cover of Outlook for the Blind.


Charles F. F. Campbell
Charles F. F. Campbell


Volume 18 * Number 1

In June 1924, the editor in chief of Outlook was Charles B. Hayes.

Charles B. Hayes
Charles B. Hayes


Volume 19 * Number 4

In March 1926, the journal reported that President Calvin Coolidge welcomed Helen Keller to the White House.

Helen Keller with President Calvin Coolidge.
Helen Keller with President Calvin Coolidge


Volume 29 * Number 5

December 1940 marks the first contribution to the journal by Berthold Lowenfeld, the Director of Research for AFB. Dr. Lowenfeld, a psychologist from Austria who taught at the Jewish School for the Blind in Vienna before accepting a Rockefeller Fellowship to study in the United States, would later teach at Teachers College, Columbia University, and serve as superintendent of the California School for the Blind.

Next: 1942-April 1951: Outlook for the Blind and The Teachers Forum

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