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  200 Years: The Life and Legacy of Louis Braille

First page of Sebastien Guillie's book  An Historical Explanation on Teaching Blind Youth [Notice Historique sur L'Instruction des Jeunes Aveugles] 1819.

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Recognition of the Braille Code
Changing of the Guard

On May 7, 1840, Dr. Pignier was forced to retire from the position of director of the Institute and was succeeded by his former assistant, Pierre-Armand Dufau. Dufau did not approve of Louis Braille's code and banned its use by students and teachers at the Institute. It is said he did not like Louis' code because he was afraid that there would be no need for sighted teachers if everyone who was blind could read as a result of using braille.

In April 1843, Louis was forced by ill-health to convalesce for six months in Coupvray. When he returned to Paris he discovered that Dufau had burned 73 books produced by Guillié and Pignier using Haüy's embossing method. The director thought a different embossing system, in use in the United States and Scotland, was superior to Haüy's system. The method was called Boston Line Type, and eventually it was found to be less effective than Louis Braille's code.


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Changing of the Guard
Braille's Code Demonstrated
The Final Years of Louis Braille
Dissemination of Braille
France Honors Its Native Son
Helen Keller in Paris


Braille Galleries:
Introduction
Introduction
Coupvray
Coupvray
Paris
Paris
Braille
Braille
Recognition
Recognition

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Celebrating 200 Years of Braille


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Introduction | Coupvray | Paris | Braille | Recognition

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