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AFBAmerican Foundation®
for the Blind

Expanding possibilities for people with vision loss

Defining My Visual Impairment-Rare Disorder

Hello,
I have a unique form of a disorder known as Autosomal Recessive Complete Congenital Stationary Night Blindness. My friends call me half blind because in low light or no light I am completely blind. Too much light is not good either or else all I see is a bright white and nothing else. I have some depth perception, but am unable to see low contrasting objects (steps, etc). No peripheral vision and strabismus. My best corrected vision is 20/70 and 20/125. I read braille and very large print (lately about 500 percent enlarged). My doctor cannot define my visual impairment because the definition of legally blindness is 20/200 best corrected with visual field of 20 degrees or less. I dont fit this criteria because in testing settings lighting and color conditions are favorable for me. However, my friends who fit this criteria can often times see more than I do. Because of the disease I have, I cannot walk without a cane, trailing the wall or a sighted guide. Does anyone know if my vision is defined as legally blind?

There are currently 4 replies


Re:Defining My Visual Impairment-Rare Disorder



wow!


Re:Defining My Visual Impairment-Rare Disorder



depending on where you live (state and country), the laws for legal blindness differ.

However, from what you said about your best corrected vision, you are not legally blind. You may be legally low vision, but it depends on the laws of your area.


Re:Defining My Visual Impairment-Rare Disorder



Dear Beccawhizkid;

It must be very frustrating for you when it comes to your vision and finding your self in both worlds. It's unclear if you have been seen by an eye doctor who specializes in seeing patients with low vision. They may have knowledge of your eye condition and help you determine if you are legally blind in your state. I hope you get some answers!
Elphie


Re:Defining My Visual Impairment-Rare Disorder



Ask your MD to check your vision with a glare measuring device.


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