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AFB American Foundation
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  AFB Talking Book Exhibit

Advertisement for a Sandwick-Bowen Talking Book machine, 1947.

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Recording Technology Moves On
Commercial Manufacture of Talking Book Machines

By 1951 about 30,000 Talking Book machines were owned by the Library of Congress and loaned to listeners who were blind through 54 local distributing agencies. At that time, the Library of Congress was purchasing 10,000 new machines annually, 5,000 of them to replace very old models, and the other 5,000 to be issued to new users. AFB and the American Printing House for the Blind also sold machines at cost to those blind or visually impaired individuals who preferred to own their machines. Increasingly, commercial businesses such as Sandwick-Bowen—whose advertisement is displayed on this page—took over the manufacture of Talking Book machines.


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A Changing Role for AFB
Commercial Manufacture of Talking Book Machines
From Record Player to Cassette Player
The Digital Talking Book


AFB Talking Book Galleries:
Early History
Early History
Partnerships
Partnerships
Helen Keller
Helen Keller
Operations Begin
Operations Begin
Technology
Technology
Narrators
Narrators

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75 Years of AFB and Talking Books

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Early History | Partnerships | Helen Keller | Operations Begin | Technology | Narrators

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