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for the Blind

Expanding possibilities for people with vision loss

Blog Posts by AFB Staff

Education Track Offerings at AFBLC19

Education track sessions emphasize collaboration, research, and personnel preparation. Orientation and mobility readiness standards, preparing teachers to work with children who have neurological visual impairments, funding university programs, and encouraging research are just some of the topics addressed. Register for the AFB Leadership Conference <img align="left" width="300" style="margin-right:10px"


Celebrate Our 2019 Award Winners!

Join us as we celebrate this year’s award recipients at AFB Leadership Conference. Migel Medal Awards The Migel Medal is the highest honor in the blindness field. The 2019 Migel Medal recipients are Glinda Foster Hill and Dr. Elton Moore. Glinda Foster Hill is an Education Program Specialist at the U.S. Department of Education, Office of Special Education Programs


AFBLC19 Early Bird Rates End This Week

Don't miss out: The early bird rate for conference registrations ends this Friday, so register today! We are also running low on hotel rooms at the group rate, so please book soon. Our group rate for hotel rooms expires on February 4. 2019 AFB Leadership Conference Crystal Gateway Marriott,


2019 AFB Leadership Conference (#AFBLC19): Aging and Vision Loss Highlights

*Special Note: Have you booked your hotel room yet? Rooms are going fast! Our room block expires on February 4 or whenever rooms sell out, so book soon to avoid disappointment: online reservations or call 888-236-2427 and reference our conference to get the group rate. Experts predict that by 2030, rates of vision loss will double along with the


Leadership Track Highlights from the 2019 AFBLC Program

Thanks to generous support from Hewlett Packard Enterprise, the 2019 AFBLC Leadership Track will provide attendees with fresh perspectives and the opportunity to learn new tactics for successful leadership from top speakers. The full program is now available


AFB’s Holiday Wish List for Older Americans

As we close out 2018 and prepare for 2019, AFB would like to share our hopes and dreams for older people in this country: complete and timely access to vision rehabilitation services, including low vision, rehabilitation, orientation and mobility, and employment for older people who have vision loss; and a fundamental change in the public understanding and acceptance of low vision and blindness that promotes equal access to high quality, fully productive, and independent lives and overcomes employment barriers for older people who are visually impaired. What Makes These


Department of Justice Confirms ADA Applies to Online Accommodations

At the American Foundation for the Blind, we were heartened to read that the Department of Justice confirmed clearly and unequivocally, in a September 26 letter to congressional representatives, that the Americans with Disabilities Act applies to online accommodations. "The Department first articulated its interpretation that the ADA applies to public accommodations' websites over 20 years ago. This interpretation is consistent with the ADA's title III requirement that the goods, services, privileges, or activities provided by places of public accommodation be equally


AFB Applauds Legislation to Strengthen the ADA & Help Small Businesses Become Accessible

We applaud the introduction of legislation to strengthen the Americans with Disabilities Act and expand the tax credits already available to small businesses who want to become more accessible to customers with disabilities. The Disabled Access Credit Expansion


Make Vision a Focus for Healthy Vision Month

Editor's note: The National Eye Institute (NEI) has proclaimed May as Healthy Vision Month.— and the National Eye Institute (NEI) needs your help to Make Vision a Focus! Did you know more than 23 million American adults have never had an eye exam? Getting regular eye exams can catch vision problems early, when they may be easier to treat. That’s why NEI is interested in making vision health a priority, by encouraging adults to take action to protect their vision and inspiring health professionals to continue teaching the importance of vision care. In conjunction with this


Inclusion for All: Celebrating Global Accessibility Awareness Day 2018

Thursday, May 17, marks the seventh Global Accessibility Awareness Day (GAAD), the purpose of which is to get everyone talking, thinking, and learning about digital access/inclusion and people with different disabilities. Every year on this day, AFB takes this opportunity to share our own resources to get the public thinking about accessibility. This year, we put together a free webinar to commemorate the day, featuring presentations by Cristopher Broyles, Chief Consulting Solutions Officer;


AFB Consulting Applauds W3C’s Proposed Recommendations

It can only be seen as a positive that W3C has made the Web Content Accessibility Guidelines (WCAG) 2.1 an official Candidate Recommendation. The latest proposed recommendation adds helpful guidance on certain areas without being overly restrictive. The focus for WCAG 2.1 has been to more fully address the accessibility requirements for: People with cognitive and learning disabilities People with low vision Mobile accessibility W3C is also working to meet an ambitious timeline to publish the first Working Draft in February 2017 and complete it by June 2018. We now have more specific guidance


AFB Staff on What Their Dog Guides Mean to Them

April 25 is International Guide Dog Day, which recognizes and celebrates the crucial role that working dogs play in enabling and supporting people who are blind or visually impaired to get around safely and independently. To that end, here at AFB we asked some of our colleagues to share their thoughts about getting around as a blind individual, their own dog guides, and the special relationship they have with their canine counterparts. Neva Fairchild, National Independent Living and Employment Specialist, on Dog Guide Vinny: <img src="http://www.afb.org/image.ashx?ImageID=8883"


American Society of Interior Designers Visits the AFB Center on Vision Loss and Esther's Place

The AFB Center on Vision Loss (CVL) was recently visited by the Texas Chapter of the American Society of Interior Designers (ASID) during their quarterly meeting. ASID members and CVL staff got acquainted with one another over a delicious baked potato bar provided by Dallas Sight and Sound. ASID Texas Chapter leaders, Karen Parks and Carrie Barron, kicked off the the day with opening remarks. Former Director of the CVL, Judy Scott, welcomed


Celebrating Larry B. Kimbler for His Many Years of Service to AFB

It often takes a personal connection to fully appreciate how much someone who is blind or visually impaired can accomplish in their livesand the challenges they might face in the process. That was the case for Larry B. Kimbler, who just completed his second term on AFB’s national Board of Trustees, serving for the last four years as board chair. Years ago, one of Kimbler’s daughters went to school with a young woman who lost her vision when she was 12 years old. Fortunately, the girl’s father was serving on the AFB Board of Trustees at the time, and had the means to send his daughter to private school and


American Foundation for the Blind Statement on the Department of Education Rescinding Guidance Documents on Students' Rights

Last Friday, October 20, the U.S. Department of Education Office of Special Education and Rehabilitative Services (OSERS) announced that it had rescinded 72 federal guidance documents relating to children's rights under the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (IDEA) and the Rehabilitation Act of 1973. OSERS wrote in a newsletter Friday that a total of 72 guidance documents that help clarify students' rights had been rescinded on October 2 "due to being outdated, unnecessary, or ineffective." Of the documents, 63 were from the Office of Special Education Programs (OSEP) and 9 came from the Rehabilitation Services Administration (RSA).


Takeaways from "Medicare Should Pay for Low Vision Devices: Views Through Different Lenses" Teleseminar

On October 4, 2017 AFB and the 21st Century Agenda on Aging and Vision Loss hosted a teleseminar, "Medicare Should Pay for Low Vision Devices: Views Through Different Lenses." We would like to thank all of the panelists (listed below) and participants who joined us for this informative discussion. A special thanks goes out to VFO who generously sponsored the event. Following are a few of the main takeaways from the call: Medicare must determine that low vision devices are eligible durable medical equipment


Breaking News: AFB Applauds Senate Action on Autonomous Vehicles Legislation Benefiting People with Vision Loss

The American Foundation for the Blind (AFB) applauds Senators John Thune, Gary Peters, Roy Blunt, and Debbie Stabenow for introducing the American Vision for Safer Transportation through Advancement of Revolutionary Technologies (AV START) Act (S. 1885). This groundbreaking bipartisan bill was passed out of the U.S. Senate Committee on Commerce, Science, and Transportation this morning, and includes many specific provisions drafted by AFB that address our concerns about the earlier House version of the bill. Among other key components, the senate bill would:


Tips to Deal with and Lessons Learned from a Natural Disaster

Our thoughts are with everyone who is coping with displacement, or whose friends and family have been impacted by Hurricane Harvey. As the vicious wind and rain of Hurricane Harvey leave east Texas and her residents in its wake and move across the coast as a tropical storm, residents are beginning to assess the damage wrought and start the process of rebuilding their lives. This week, the Journal of Visual Impairment & Blindness has made available the article Disoriented and Immobile: The Experiences of People with Visual Impairments During and After the


Simple Accommodations Can Improve Workplace Safety for All

The Washington Post reports that the U.S. workplace accident death rate is higher for older workers. In the article, however, they also cite Ruth Finkelstein, co-director of Columbia University’s Aging Center, who cautioned against stereotyping. She said older people have a range of physical and mental abilities and that it’s


American Foundation for the Blind and 74 National Disability Organizations Strongly Oppose Revised Better Care Reconciliation Act

We join with members of the Consortium for Citizens with Disabilities (CCD) in strongly opposing the revised Better Care Reconciliation Act (BCRA). While we have serious concerns about many provisions of the BCRA, including a new provision that would dramatically increase costs for people with preexisting conditions, we cannot overstate the danger facing the millions of adults and children with disabilities if the bill’s Medicaid proposals are adopted by the Senate. The bill’s imposition of a per capita cap and the effective end of the adult Medicaid expansion would cut federal support by $756 billion by 2026, decimating a program that for decades has provided essential healthcare and long term services and supports to millions of adults and children with disabilities. Some


Riding Driverless on the Highway to Independence?

No Limits to the Possibilities, but Accessibility Remains Key Concern The U.S. House Energy and Commerce Subcommittee on Digital Commerce and Consumer Protection voted unanimously this week to advance autonomous vehicle legislation. But the House bill dropped a provision that sought to promote access to self-driving cars for people with disabilities. Mark Richert, AFB Director of Public Policy, expressed concern. “We hope the language the American Foundation


Wrapping Up the 2017 AFB Leadership Conference

From left to right: Bernadette Kappen, Ph.D., Executive Director of the New York Institute for Special Education, Mark Richert, Esq., Kirk Adams, president and CEO of AFB, Lee Huffman, editor of AccessWorld Magazine, Matt Kaplowitz, President and Chief Creative Officer of Bridge Multimedia, Tanseela Molani, Design Researcher for United Airlines, and David Jeppson, Executive Director of Computers for the Blind The AFB Leadership Conference has been jam-packed. We were so proud last night to honor Bridge Multimedia,


Entertainment Technology Accessibility Status: The Good, the Bad, and the Delayed

Hollywood is waist deep into its annual awards season. There was a time when there would be little reason for blind or visually impaired people to take note of Tinseltown’s award-caliber offerings, as most visual media would have been largely inaccessible. This is less so today, thanks to emerging technologies that bring visual media to life for visually impaired audiences in theaters and at home, as well as to hard-fought legislation that is slowly making these technologies more widely available. Unfortunately, not everyone can fully enjoy Moonlight at the local multiplex or independently cue up a


Lessons from New Zealand Earthquakes Can Help People with Visual Impairments Prepare for Disasters

In light of the recent 7.8-magnitude earthquake that struck New Zealand's South Island on Monday, November 14th, and the 6.9-magnitude earthquake that struck Japan's Honshu Island on Tuesday, November 22nd, the American Foundation for the Blind (AFB) extends its heartfelt sympathy to all those affected by the initial tremor and aftershocks. To help people with visual impairments, especially older people with vision loss, prepare for similar situations, AFB would like to share a few disaster-preparedness tips from an article that will appear in the forthcoming special issue of the Journal of Visual Impairment & Blindness (JVIB) on aging and vision. <img src="http://www.afb.org/image.asp?ImageID=7946" alt="Older man sitting on a wooden bench with his


On Veterans Day, Resources for Soldiers Who Have Become Blind or Visually Impaired

The American Foundation for the Blind was founded in 1921 to advocate for


Voices Heard: Disability Policy Becomes Part of the Public Debate

The growing organization and activism of the disability community is successfully getting the attention of candidates running for office. Today's disability policy speech by Hillary Clinton, as well as the media's interest in asking candidates questions about disability policy, represents a significant shift from how the issues we champion have been acknowledged in past presidential elections. In Illinois, a


Helen Keller: A Love Affair

Image: Helen Keller smelling flowers, circa 1919. This is the fourth in our series of posts celebrating Helen Keller and the wonderful new avenues that are opening up for research about her life and legacy as a result of the Helen Keller Digitization Project. This week’s post is from Christopher Carlson, author, screenwriter and playwright. Enjoy! I’m thrilled by the diligent work being done at American Foundation for the Blind to digitize its prodigious Helen Keller


Pokémon GO: Let’s Catch ’em All!

By William Reuschel and Aaron Preece Image: Aaron Preece stands with his guide dog Joel and a Pidgey Pokémon. Pokémon mania is sweeping the nation once again! The latest incarnation of the game that has players collecting and battling fictional creatures is called Pokémon GO, but this version is a little different from past games. You cant play GO on your couch. In fact, youll have a hard time playing it indoors at all. Pokémon GO is all about getting players outside and interacting with various points of interest around their towns.


Accessibility in Digital Publishing: Notes from a Summit

New federal regulations on accessibility for digital and web publishing are expected to have a significant impact on the publishing industry. The American Foundation for the Blind was pleased to co-sponsor, and AFB staff were pleased to attend, a summit on accessibility in publishing, along with many other publishers and accessibility experts, hosted by the Center for Publishing Innovation. Discussions included the impact of revisions to Section 508 and Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act and the


Four Ways Google Is Building a More Accessible World for the Visually Impaired

On the heels of major accessibility announcements from Twitter and Facebook, tech giant Google recently highlighted its own efforts to build a more inclusive world for people with disabilities. Here are four ways Google is working to improve the lives of people who are blind or visually impaired: 1.


Join Parents and Teachers in Supporting the Cogswell-Macy Act on April 14th!

The American Foundation for the Blind needs your help! This week, we are asking all of you to support the Cogswell-Macy Act, the most comprehensive special education legislation for students with sensory disabilities to date. Call in on April 14th to ensure key resources are available to these students and their parents and educators through and expansion of the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (IDEA). Parents and teachers around the country are rallying around this bill. We asked for stories about the importance of


More Firsthand Accounts from People Who Attended the 2016 AFB Leadership Conference

VisionAware peer advisor Audrey Demmitt recently attended the American Foundation for the Blind Leadership Conference in Washington, DC. She writes, “As a consumer and paraprofessional who works with the visually impaired and blind community, I found it both informational and inspirational. I came away feeling very encouraged by all the efforts, research, product development and initiatives that are taking place on behalf of those who live with vision loss." She was particularly impressed by all of the accessible technology presented at the conference. Read her full report on the "Visually Impaired: Now What?" blog:


Thank You to Everyone Who Attended the 2016 AFB Leadership Conference

Thank you to the 400 wonderful attendees of the 2016 AFB Leadership Conference, who made the conference a fabulous place to network and meet other dedicated professionals from around the United States and abroad! We wouldn't be able to pull off this conference without the longstanding support of our sponsors, including presenting sponsors JPMorgan Chase & Co, and the Consumer Technology Association(tm) (CTA) and CTA Foundation, and our partners: Vision Serve Alliance, Conference Ally Maryland School for the Blind Virginia Department for the Blind and Vision Impaired


Day 3 of the 2016 AFB Leadership Conference

It's the final day of a packed 2016 AFB Leadership Conference. Last night we celebrated our retiring President & CEO Carl R. Augusto's 25 years of outstanding leadership and service to the American Foundation for the Blind. If you are able to, please join us in honoring


Speaking with More AFBLC 2016 Attendees

Paige Berry, of the Helen Keller National Center for Deaf-Blind Youths and Adults, shared her thoughts on returning to the AFB Leadership Conference (AFBLC). The AFBLC seeks to improve the quality of programs and services to blind and visually impaired children and adults. AFBLC provides a forum in which leadership personnel, in both education and rehabilitation, have the opportunity to increase their awareness of student and client needs, expand their knowledge, refine leadership skills, and share concerns and strategies. To find out more and register for the upcoming AFB Leadership Conference, please visit


Day 2 of the 2016 AFB Leadership Conference

The AFB Leadership Conference (AFBLC) seeks to improve the quality of programs and services to blind and visually impaired children and adults. AFBLC provides a forum in which leadership personnel, in both education and rehabilitation, have the opportunity to increase their awareness of student and client needs, expand their knowledge, refine leadership skills, and share concerns and strategies. We were delighted to speak with Tanya Hilligoss, director of outreach for the Nebraska Center for the Education of Children Who Are Blind or Visually Impaired, another first-time participant in an AFB Leadership


Kicking Off the 2016 AFB Leadership Conference

Susan Mazrui, her service dog, and presenter Deborah Marriott Harrison Congratulations to Susan Mazrui, current director for Public Policy at AT&T and a former AFB Trustee, who received the 2016 Stephen Garff Marriott Award! The award honors a blind or visually impaired individual who has served as an extraordinary mentor or who has attained remarkable professional success. Mazrui currently works on disability-related public policy issues and serves as the co-chair of the Federal Communications


An Interview with a First-time Attendee at the AFB Leadership Conference

Year after year, the AFB Leadership Conference covers the most pressing and relevant topics in the field of blindness and offers many opportunities to learn from the best and brightest minds in our field, make new connections, and reunite with old friends. To find more information and register for the upcoming AFB Leadership Conference, visit www.afb.org/afblc. In 2016, we spoke with Megan Doddformerly with the East Texas Lighthouse for the Blind, now Director of the AFB Center on Vision Lossat her first ever AFB Leadership Conference. Hear what she had to say about her experience. (See full transcript below.)


Valentine's Day Ideas for Friends and Family Who Are Blind or Visually Impaired

With Valentine's Day right around the corner, there's still time to share the love with beautiful Helen Keller-themed gifts that help support the American Foundation for the Blind and its programs. Plus, all jewelry is on sale for a limited time. You can choose from a sterling silver


Digital Millennium Copyright Act (DMCA) Reform and the Right to Read

“At the American Foundation for the Blind (AFB), we have worked for nearly a century to break down societal barriers and eliminate discrimination by achieving equal access to the world of copyrighted works. But for all the promise of technology to provide equal access to copyrighted works, the copyright laws that protect those works have sometimes served to impede that technology.” Mark Richert, Esq., Director of Public Policy, was part of an expert panel at a free Public Knowledge luncheon today, entitled “DMCA Reform: Lessons from the Copyright Office’s Triennial Review.” Read his post on the Public Knowledge blog,


16 Braille Resources in Honor of World Braille Day 2016

"Braille is knowledge, and knowledge is power." - Louis Braille Louis Braille, the inventor of braille, was born two hundred and seven years ago on January 4, 1809. In his honor, we've gathered 16 braille resources in celebration of World Braille Day 2016! 1.What is braille, anyway? It’s not a language, but a system of raised dots that can be read with the fingers by people who are blind or who have low vision. Braille is a code by which many languagessuch as English, Spanish, Arabic, Chinese, and dozens of othersmay be written and read.


High School Assistant Principal to Run 2015 NYC Marathon for AFB

Patrick Dunphy is unafraid of challenges. Recently recovering from retinal surgery, he plans to run the New York City Marathon this November while raising funds for AFB. "I like how AFB encourages people with vision loss to stretch and challenge themselves to aim higher," he said. Dunphy, 32, is Assistant Principal and head of the Social Studies department at Francis Lewis High School in Fresh Meadows (Queens, NY). He has a lot in common with his hero, Theodore Roosevelt. Like the 26th U.S. president, he likes to persevere and, will run the marathon in November, despite recent eye surgery. "Teddy


Tips for Teaching Reading from Teachers of Students with Visual Impairments

We asked, you answered. Here are a collection of teacher comments made on the AFB Press Facebook page in response to the question, "What is your best advice or success about teaching reading skills to children who are blind or visually impaired?" “When I first became a TVI [teacher of students with visual impairments] I had a group of teens who were not very motivated to read or write. This was many moons ago and they wanted computer games for


10 Accessibility Resources in Honor of Global Accessibility Awareness Day (#GAAD)

In honor of Global Accessibility Awareness Day, please enjoy and share these resources, and add your own suggestions in the comments! 1. AccessWorld(r)AFB's free online magazine is devoted to technology news for people who are blind or visually impaired. AccessWorld keeps people with vision loss and their families, teachers, rehabilitation counselors, product developers and manufacturers up to date about the technologies that can transform their lives: smart glasses, fitness tools, mobile apps,


Attendee Highlight: the AFB Leadership Conference 2015

It's been a great conference in Phoenix, AZ, so far. Day 2 of our Leadership Conference is well underway! This annual conference, which kicked off yesterday and runs through Saturday, covers the most pressing and relevant topics in the field of blindness and offers many opportunities to learn from the best and brightest minds, make new connections, and reunite with old friends. So far, we've taken a deep dive into research with our public policy team, gotten our tech on with AccessWorld magazine, learned about Non-24 Disorder, Googled our docs, gone in depth with Apple VoiceOver, and much more. We


February Is Age-Related Macular Degeneration (AMD) Month

Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is the leading cause of vision loss for people aged 60 and older in the United States. According to the American Academy of Ophthalmology (AAO), 10-15 million individuals have AMD and about 10% of those affected have the "wet" type of age-related macular degeneration. If you or someone you love has been diagnosed with age-related macular degeneration, here is just a small sampling of resources from the American Foundation for the Blind to help you cope with this condition.


Jewelry, Braille-Labeled Gifts, and Accessible Cards for Valentine's Day!

"What we once enjoyed and deeply loved we can never lose, for all that we love deeply becomes a part of us." -Helen Keller With Valentine's Day right around the corner, there's still time to share the love with beautiful Helen Keller-themed jewelry that helps


Make Your Super Bowl Extra Super with Our Game Day Tips for Viewers Who Are Blind or Visually Impaired

The Super Bowl kicks off on Sunday, so get into the spirit with our roundup of resources for every football fan! Even if you are only interested in the Super Bowl commercials, you’ll want to check out Web Director Crista Earl’s look at Comcast’s new talking guide for accessible television and how it can help everyone get more out of the viewing experience. It was a memorable year in professional sports, and our own resident sports expert Joe Strechay shared his


10 Braille Resources From the American Foundation for the Blind in Honor of Louis Braille's Birthday

“O the delicious taste of independence that comes with an embossed book, and a Braille tablet!” - Helen Keller To celebrate World Braille Day 2015, marked annually on January 4th in honor of Louis Braille, the inventor of braille who was born on this day in 1809, we've gathered 10 braille resources and articles you'll want to bookmark and share. Happy World Braille Day! 1. AFB's online museum celebrating "200 Years: The Life and Legacy of Louis Braille" honored the Louis Braille Bicentennial by tracing his life through


Gift Ideas for Friends and Family Members Who Are Blind or Visually Impaired

It's that time of year again, when we're all searching for gift-giving ideas. If you have close friends or family members who are blind, visually impaired, or losing their sight, here are some gift-giving guides you might want to check out. From young children to working-age adults to seniors who are gradually losing their vision, the American Foundation for the Blind has you covered. AccessWorld(r) brings you some high- and low-tech gift ideas that are completely accessible to people who are blind or who have low visionand they are all priced under $100. Check out the


8 Key Resources on Diabetes, Diabetic Retinopathy, and Vision Loss from the American Foundation for the Blind

Diabetes is a complex condition that, if not carefully managed and treated, can lead to complications such as diabetic retinopathy, which can cause "blind spots," blurring, and vision loss. The American Foundation for the Blind, in honor of National Diabetes Month, has gathered key resources to help you care for yourself when you have diabetes and vision loss. Please share these 8 critical resources on diabetes and diabetic retinopathy: Read more about it: AFB's Guide to Living with


Happy Halloween! Tips and Articles from the American Foundation for the Blind

It's almost Halloween night! But what if your child is visually impaired, and not a big fan of dressing up in costumes? Whether you're excited or filled with Halloween dread, here are some ways to have fun with the holiday: Get tactile: NAPVI mom Maria Dibernardo shared some great pumpkin activities for children who are blind or visually impaired. Get creative: Emily Coleman a teacher of students who are visually impaired who is also the mom to Eddie,


Happy National Guide Dog Month!

Hi, I'm Paige, and I'm a dog guide. I've blogged here before, and so has my master, Crista Earl, who wrote a several-part diary telling how we first met. I wanted to give a shout-out to all my fellow dog guides because it's September, which is National Guide Dog Month. Recently my master and her colleagues took a trip to a wonderful place called The Seeing Eye in Morristown, New


An Interview with Michael Peters, Tournament-Based Fishing Angler

Recently, our CareerConnect(r) Employment Specialist, Detra Bannister, chatted with Michael Peters, a tournament-based fishing angler. Michael has glaucoma, which has led to some vision loss, but he has found ways to adapt to his low vision status. Using information from his eye specialist and from AFB, he has learned to continue doing what he loves and is eager to share his knowledge and encouragement as an AFB CareerConnect mentor.


Let's Play Beep Baseball!

Get into the swing of things and play some beep baseball! Beep baseball is an adapted form of the traditional sport. It consists of a ball that is larger than a softball, which beeps consistently so players are able to hit it when pitched, and find it in the field. There are two bases rigged with a buzzing sound that are triggered when the ball is hit, so the runner knows which way to go. Beep baseball is a great opportunity for people who are blind or visually impaired to run without a cane. The rules of beep baseball help make the game safer and simpler to score. Rule modifications include: There are a total of three bases: home,


Take a Hike! Enjoying Hiking After Vision Loss

Take a Hike! It's a great time of year to get outdoors and get moving, so AFB is talking about hiking as a recreational activity for people who are blind or visually impaired. VisionAware's Ashley Nemeth shares her love of hiking and offers helpful tips on hiking with a cane and with a guide dog. FamilyConnect blogger Emily Coleman shares a parent's perspective on


Getting Into the Swim of Things as a Person Who Is Blind or Visually Impaired

Come on in; the water's fine! AFB continues our summer recreation series with a look at swimming. Swimming can be an excellent activity for people who are blind or visually impaired. Whether you are looking to swim some serious laps, get a great workout, or just cool off on a sweltering day, get the latest on the quintessential summertime activity. Before you head to the beach or the pool, read up on VisionAware's Tips for Swimmers Who Are Blind or Visually Impaired. Children or beginning adult swimmers might need to swim


Win an e-Book for the Beach!

As we have traveled around the country talking with teachers, we have been amazed at how many of you told us that you catch up on your professional reading while on vacation, and even read AFB Press books and JVIB on the beach! So to recognize your amazing dedication, we are giving away 3 e-books that can be read on tablet devices while also enjoying sand, surf, and sun. To enter, simply enter a comment below, or on the


AFB Applauds the Adoption of the Accessible Rich Internet Applications (WAI-ARIA) 1.0 Recommendation

On March 20, 2014, the World Wide Web Consortium (W3C) Web Accessibility Initiative (WAI) took an important step to make web content and applications more accessible to people with disabilities by publishing Accessible Rich Internet Applications (WAI-ARIA) 1.0 as a W3C Recommendation. WAI-ARIA defines ways that developers of browsers, media players, mobile devices and assistive technologies, as well as content developers, can achieve greater cross-platform accessibility. Learn more about WAI-ARIA. "ARIA is general tool which can be used to add accessibility to many different technologies," said Tim Berners-Lee, W3C


This Valentine’s Day, Send a Helen Keller eCard... and Other Gift Ideas for People with Vision Loss

Perhaps AFB's most famous advocate said it best: "Cultivate love for love is the light that gives the eye to see great and noble things." With Valentine's Day right around the corner, Helen's wise words have never rung truer. In light of this upcoming special day, why not share the love with a Helen Keller eCard? Our Helen Keller eCards are high contrast and large-print, featuring beautiful photos, with quotes from Helen. These electronic cards are accessible for people who are blind or have low vision, and allow you to type in


Window-Eyes for Office: Why Is This So Important?

Editor's note: the following post is authored by Mary Bellard, Information Technology Services Manager at AFB. On January 14, GW Micro announced, with support from Microsoft, they will make their Window-Eyes screen reader product available at no additional cost to any user with a license to Microsoft Office 2010 or newer (including users with a Microsoft Office 365 subscription). The only stipulation for using the full version of this product is that Office 2010 or newer needs to be installed and activated locally; users with access only to Microsoft Web Apps will be limited to a 30-minute version of the product. This version


Celebrating the Life and Work of Louis Braille, 205 Years Later

Saturday, January 4, marks the 205th birthday of Louis Braille, the inventor of his eponymous code for people with vision loss. In celebration of his birthday, as well as National Braille Literacy Month, we’ve assembled a roundup of braille-centric content throughout AFB's family of sites. Read up, reflect, and appreciate what braille has meant to so many. Braille continues to be a driving force for people with vision loss. Throughout January, we will be sharing information relevant to braillehistory, technology, and so forth. Here's a collection of articles to kick things off. We would


AFB Talks Tech: Tech Director to Discuss AFB Apps

This January, AFB's Darren Burton, director of our AFB Tech labs in Huntington, WV, will be appearing on ACB Reports, the American Council of the Blind Radio Show hosted by Mike Duke. Darren will discuss AFB's app development work, including the AccessNote notetaker app and the AccessWorld magazine app, as well as our other app testing and development work being done at our AFB Tech labs. AccessNote has now been


Gift Ideas for Friends and Family Members who Are Blind or Visually Impaired: AFB Has You Covered

Editorial note: Visit our 2014 Gift Ideas for Friends and Family Members Who Are Blind or Visually Impaired roundup for fresh ideas! This time of year, we’re all searching for gift-giving inspiration. If you have a close friend or family member who is blind or visually impaired, here are some gift-giving guides you might want to check out. From young children to working-age adults to seniors who are gradually losing


For #GivingTuesday, 10 Reasons to Support AFB

Tis' the season for giving. AFB is so very thankful to all of you who support our mission to remove barriers, create solutions, and expand possibilities so people with vision loss can achieve their full potential. This holiday season, consider participating in #GivingTuesdaya campaign to create a national day of giving on the Tuesday following Thanksgiving, Black Friday, and Cyber Mondayby making a donation to AFB. Your simple gesture of generosity will make a huge difference to someone whom you may never meet, but whose


What You Must Know Before Assessing a Child for Orientation and Mobility Instruction

Editor's note: The following is an excerpt from a recent article posted on the Professional Development section of AFB.org. There are important differences between how you teach orientation and mobility (O&M) skills to an adult and how you teach them to a child. Effective instruction of children begins with a careful assessment that takes into consideration their unique development and needs. From the very beginning, an instructor must understand these needs to be able to conduct an effective assessment.


Attention Blindness Professionals: JVIB Wants Your Input

Are you interested in employment and transition? The Journal of Visual Impairment & Blindness (JVIB) is planning a free online event that will coincide with the November-December JVIB Special Issue on Employment and Transition, edited by Karen Wolffe. The week of November 18th, JVIB will be hosting an open forum with a blog by Joe Strechay, program manager for


Be an Advocate! Help Strengthen Specialized Services

As advocates for people who are blind or visually impaired, the American Foundation for the Blind (AFB) knows first-hand the value of specialized services. They change lives by teaching people with vision loss the skills needed to thrive in the classroom, the workplace and everyday life. Yet, these services are almost perpetually in danger of being cut due to shrinking state budgets. It is therefore crucial that we continue to advocate to our policymakers of their importance, and to ensure such services are kept in place. To that end, AFB has created new advocacy materials on strengthening specialized services that we hope you will share with your


AFB Press Interviews Cynthia Sun, Mother of a Visually Impaired Student

[Editor's note: In 2007, AFB Press published "Cortical Visual Impairment: An Approach to Assessment and Intervention" by Christine Roman-Lantzy. Pictured on the cover was 12 year-old Jeremy Sun. We recently caught up with his mother, Cynthia, to see how Jeremy, now 18, was doing.] Tell us about Jeremy. How has he been doing? Jeremy is now 18 years old and ready to move on to a new environment this


Welcoming People Who Are Visually Impaired to Your Worship Community

[Editor's note: The following is an excerpt from Diversity and Visual Impairment: The Influence of Race, Gender, Religion, and Ethnicity on the Individual, edited by Madeline Milian and Jane Erin. This excerpt was authored by Virginia Bishop.] The inclusion of visually impaired people in a religious community does not usually happen by accident; it is more often the result of planned efforts. Although each congregation is different, there are some general guidelines that may help in designing a plan. If enduring


Webinar Alert: Using iPads in the Classroom for Students with Visual and Multiple Disabilities

The AFB eLearning Center is pleased to offer the second of an ongoing series of webinars that focus on the use of iPads in the classroom for students with visual and other disabilities. The webinar series is presented by Dr. Betsy Flener, who has over 25 years of experience as a teacher and consultant including serving as a regional consultant for the Kentucky School for the Blind. She is currently an assistive technology consultant for the Green River Regional Educational Cooperative. This second webinar, titled


Listening Guidelines for English Language Learners

Editor's note: The following is a transcript excerpt from "Listening Guidelines for English Language Learners," a webinar presented by Madeline Milian. Teachers who work with students who are visually impaired know that smell, touch and hearing explain the world. But when the individuals can no longer rely on listening skills because the language they're using is different from the language of instruction, they suffer a significant setback in understanding what's going on around them.


For Teachers: Basic Tips For When You Have a Visually Impaired Student in Your Class

[Editor’s Note: The following post is excerpted from When You Have a Visually Impaired Student in Your Classroom: A Guide for Teachers, edited by Susan J. Spungin and available via AFB Press. Further details available at the end of this post.] Will you have a child with a visual impairment in your classroom this year? Individuals working with children with visual impairments, whether or not they have other disabilities, will find the following basic guidelines helpful in interacting with students:


Hijinks Ensue: Audio Describing a Live Screening of Hitchcock's "The Trouble With Harry"

We're pleased to provide a guest post today by Madeleine Fix, on the experience of providing live audio description for a classic movie. By Madeleine Fix Recently I provided audio description (AD) for Alfred Hitchcock's "The Trouble With Harry," screened in the Columbus Association for the Performing Arts (CAPA) Summer Movie Series at the historic Ohio Theatre in Columbus, Ohio. The service is


Dr. James Jan Publishes Final Contribution in Journal of Visual Impairment & Blindness

This summer, the Journal of Visual Impairment & Blindness (JVIB) will feature the final publication by a giant in the research of neuroplasticity of the brain and how it relates to vision. Dr. James E. Jan, founder, retired professor, and senior research scientist emeritus of the Visual Impairment Program at BC Children's Hospital, Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada, is best known for his groundbreaking work that contributed enormously to the field's discussion of the nature of cortical visual impairment. The article, "Windows into the Visual Brain: New Discoveries About the Visual System, Its Functions, and


Be Like Helen on Her Birthday; Be an Advocate!

[Editor's note: The following post is authored by Keller Johnson-Thompson, Helen Keller's great-grandniece.] My Great Grand Aunt, Helen Keller, was a unique woman. Not only did she overcome the double dungeon of darkness and silence in her own life, but she fought to help others overcome the obstacles that stood in the paths of their lives as well. From women's suffrage, to civil rights, to labor laws, my aunt wanted a world in which every individual would have equal rights under the law. I know without a


A Look Back at the American Foundation for the Blind 2013 Leadership Conference

From April 18-20, AFB hosted its annual flagship conference (formerly titled the Josephine L. Taylor Leadership Institute), together with Illinois AER, in Chicago. With over two dozen exhibitors and more than 400 attendees, we made many new friends and reconnected with old ones. In spite of some initial bad weather, attendance was strong. A day of pre-conference sessions gave way to Friday morning’s keynote address from Chieko Asakawa, Ph.D., of IBM Research-Tokyo. Blind since the age of 14, Asakawa discussed the history of disability technology in a speech entitled "Accessibility Ignites Innovation." The keynote set the tone for the next two days, as the multiple sessions


A Q&A with Helen Selsdon, Helen Keller Archivist

Celebrating Helen During Women's History Month [Editor's note: In light of Women's History Month, this post concludes our series of interviews with Helen Keller experts on the AFB Blog. The following Q&A comes courtesy of Helen Selsdon, Archivist at the American Foundation for the Blind, including the Helen Keller Archives.] How has your close contact with so much of Helen's writings and, well, life, affected you?


You're Invited! AFB Bookstore Virtual Open House - Save 20%!

We invite you to tour the newly redesigned AFB Bookstore and save 20% on all publications during AFB's Virtual Open House this Wednesday through Friday, March 27-29, using code AFBSTORE13. Other activities include giveaways and contests to win AFB Press books and DVDs. AFB will announce details each day of the Open House on the AFB Bookstore page at www.afb.org/store and through the AFB Press Facebook page at www.facebook.com/connectwithpress beginning Wednesday morning. The redesigned store makes it


A Q&A with Doreen Rappaport, Author of “Helen’s Big World”

Celebrating Helen During Women's History Month [Editor's note: In light of Women's History Month, we'll be running a series of interviews with Helen Keller experts on the AFB Blog. The following Q&A comes courtesy of Doreen Rappaport, author of the award-winning biography Helen's Big World.] Many books have been written about Helen Keller, including many children’s books. What motivated you to write one as well? What sets yours apart? I visit many schools each year talking to children


A Q&A with Keller Johnson-Thompson, Helen Keller's great-grandniece

Celebrating Helen During Women's History Month [Editor's note: In light of Women's History Month, we will be running a series of interviews with Helen Keller experts on the AFB Blog. First up: Keller Johnson-Thompson, Helen's great-grandniece.] Helen Keller was an ambassador for those with vision loss. Working for the Helen Keller Foundation for Research and Education, you are an ambassador for Helen. What difficulties do you come across, if any, in promoting the life of a


Dog Guide Diary: Monday Madness

In this new series, guest blogger and Center on Vision Loss volunteer Holly will chronicle her experience in attaining a new dog guide. Monday Madness Today was our most action-packed day, so far. All was going well while I was getting ready, and I figured things would continue that way. I had already fed Tyra and took her out. It was raining, but that’s nothing new. On my first day here, we had the obligatory fire drill practice, and I thought that was the end of it. I was putting on my makeup when a strange sound that I’d never heard began. I didn't think


Dog Guide Diary: Weekend Roundup

In this new series, guest blogger and Center on Vision Loss volunteer Holly will chronicle her experience in attaining a new dog guide. Stepping Out Saturday Saturday was full of adventures. After another great breakfast, and a dog distraction on the way to the van, we headed into Portland. I'm happy to report that, for the first time, I was not cold! I didn’t even have to wear a jacket, and for this Texan, that was a welcome change. Normally, because our lounge is downtown, parking is at a premium. But today we only had to park a block away. I was able to exit the van without help from my instructor, which made things feel real. Our objective was to go to the mall and


Dog Guide Diary: Fast Moving Friday!

In this new series, guest blogger and Center on Vision Loss volunteer Holly chronicles her experience attaining a new dog guide. Fast Moving Friday! Happy Friday! Today was fast and furious. It started with the fact that it was raining like crazy when I woke up. It made me nervous because the sound of the rain can block sounds in the environment and make it harder to read traffic. We had another dog distraction along the sidewalk en route to our vans. Tyra had to do a timeout, but afterward she regained her focus very quickly. I was very proud. Everything


Dog Guide Diary: Working the Wild Wednesday

In this new series, guest blogger and Center on Vision Loss volunteer Holly chronicles her experience attaining a new dog guide. Working the Wild Wednesday Coming to you live from the Portland lounge, with lots to report. First off, we have worked two very successful routes, and for those of you who know my lack of interest in coffee, you will find it funny that our destination route was to a local Starbucks. I have been inside it once to find the counter. Each of us will be working with another person as a team. The person I am working with is training


Dog Guide Diary: Meeting Tyra on Monday

In this new series, guest blogger and Center on Vision Loss volunteer Holly chronicles her experience attaining a new dog guide. Meeting Tyra on Monday I would like to introduce you to my very own runway model, Tyra! She is a yellow lab that is almost white. She has dark eyeliner and a pink nose. She is 21 inches tall at the shoulder and weighs 51 pounds. She is very responsive and heels very well. She waits for instructions when working, and is steady and fast. She already knows that my balance is poor and she checks on me as we


Dog Guide Diary: A Firsthand Account

In this new series, guest blogger and Center on Vision Loss volunteer Holly will chronicle her experience in attaining a new dog guide. Day 1 I was in a hurry, as usual, when I left the house with my parents to go to the airport en route to the Guide Dogs for the Blind (GDB) Oregon Campus. I left Pollyann, my retiring guide dog, at home because, I thought if she saw me walking away with my cane, she would get upset. I flew with a man from my area who will be training with his first


Helen Keller Continues to Inspire

Over the past couple of months, we at AFB have received a number of correspondences regarding the announcement and promotion of various Helen Keller-related projects. While we can't always honor every request, we have been impressed with what has crossed our desks. Crazy as it sounds, there are many out there who don't know who Helen Keller was. So to see so many creative projects taking place with Helen as inspiration makes us proudand, we think, would have made Helen herself smile. Here's a brief look at some of our recent favorites. Three Days to See An


Braille Roundup: Celebrating the Life and Work of Louis Braille

Today marks the 204th birthday of Louis Braille, the inventor of his eponymous code for people with vision loss. In celebration of his birthday and National Braille Literacy Month, we’ve assembled a roundup of braille-centric content throughout AFB's family of sites. Read up, reflect on, and appreciate what braille has meant to so many. Braille continues to be a driving force for people with vision loss. Throughout January, we will be sharing information relevant to braillehistory, technology, and so forth. Here's a collection of articles to kick things off. We would love to hear your thoughts in the comments!


Erik Weihenmayer is off to new adventures; new book may help others follow suit

[Editor's Note: The following post is authored by Paul Ponchillia, Professor Emeritus at Western Michigan University and Olympic Torch runner. Dr. Ponchillia is the founder of sports camps for children with visual impairments nationwide and also co-author of Physical Education and Sports for People with Visual Impairments and Deafblindness: Foundations of Instruction, recently published by AFB Press.] If you’re a New York Times reader, perhaps you saw the


A Thought on Dog Guides in the Workplace

[Editor's Note: The following post comes from Jim Kutsch, in light of September as National Guide Dog month. In addition to his role as president and CEO of The Seeing Eye, Jim is also a CareerConnect mentor.] I first came to The Seeing Eye in 1970 as a 19-year-old sophomore at West Virginia University. My Seeing Eye dogs helped me through a number of careers, starting as a college professor and then as executive in the telecommunications industry. Today, I have the unique distinction of being the first Seeing Eye


September is National Guide Dog Month

In light of this month's celebration of guide dogs, we’ve assembled some favorite past (and present) posts throughout AFB's blog network that highlight the importance of, and our love for, our canine helper-friends. Dog Guide Etiquette, From One Who Knows (AFB) Can a Guide Dog "Know" Its Owner Is Blind? (VisionAware) Going to the Dogs Doesn't Mean a Life Without Computer Access (AccessWorld)


Finding Fitness, Sport and Recreation: From Physical Education to the Paralympics

[Editor's Note: The following post is authored by Dr. Lauren Lieberman. Dr. Lieberman is a graduate of Oregon State in the Movement Studies in Disabilities Program, and is currently a Distinguished Service Professor at SUNY Brockport in the area of Adapted Physical Education. Dr. Lieberman is the founder of Camp Abilities, a developmental sports camp for children with visual impairments. She is also co-author of the upcoming AFB Press book Physical Education and Sports for People with Visual Impairments and


On Navigating New York's Streets and Sidewalks

[Editor's Note: the following post comes in response to the recent New York Times article, "With Changes in New York's Streets, More Hurdles for the City's Blind Pedestrians" and is authored by Dan Aronoff. Dan is a licensed social worker (LMSW) currently looking for work helping people with disabilities. He also happens to be New York's premier blind food critic. Check out his blog at blindtastetest.net, and follow him on Twitter at @blindblog.] <img


Wanted: Your Input for Upcoming AccessWorld Article

[Editor's note: the following post comes from Deborah Kendrick, Senior Features Editor for AccessWorld.] It's the dreaded call we all have to make at some point: contacting technical support for a mainstream commercial company, where we know we'll talk to a technician who has no clue how people who or blind or have low vision use a computer. My own experience has run the gamut. There was the guy for my internet service provider, talking to me all the way from India, who kept saying upon learning that I was blind, "I'm so


What do you think of our new site?

Earlier this week, we announced the launch of our new website (and if you're currently reading this blog post, perhaps you've noticed already). A lot of planning and work went into this project, and we wanted to take this opportunity to thank the many people who gave us feedback along the way. People who were losing their vision, or had been blind for years, along with family members, professionals, and members of the general publicall participated in the early card-sorting exercises that


Around the web: What we're reading this week

With a number of AFB staff attending the 27th annual CSUN International Technology and Persons with Disabilities Conference this week, we've been keeping a close eye on the goings-on there. Meanwhile, in Washington D.C., Congressman Markey (D-Mass) just introduced an important piece of legislation. In addition to these topics, here are a few stories that caught our attention this week: Congressman Ed Markey (press release): Markey Introduces Legislation to Improve Prescription Drug Labeling for


Around the web: What we've been reading

Here at AFB Headquarters, we like to keep up on important news related to vision loss. Here are some interesting news stories and blog posts from this past week: InnovationNewsDaily: New App Lets You Text Without Looking This article examines a forthcoming (free) app, Brailletouch, that would allow users to text without ever looking at their phones. (More information on this story via CNN's What's Next blog.)


Survey Request: Accessing Electronic Reading Materials

The Digital Images and Graphic Resources for Accessible Materials (DIAGRAM) Center is a U.S. Department of Education-funded project, conducted by Benetech, with the US Fund for DAISY and the WGBH National Center for Accessible Media. DIAGRAM is conducting a brief survey to track trends in how people with print disabilities obtain and access reading materials electronically. Your answers will help DIAGRAM focus their research and development efforts on the reading tools and digital reading materials. Please take a few moments to visit the link below and provide your


A True Pioneer In Our Field: Remembering Dr. James Bliss

Ike Presley, AFB National Project Manager: We recently lost Dr. James (Jim) Bliss to cancer. He was truly one of the pioneers in the field of technology for people who are blind or have low vision. His first major contribution was in the development of the Optacon. Back in the 1970s, he developed this landmark tool in conjunction with Professor John Linvill to provide John?s daughter, Candy, a tool for accessing printed information. For many years this was the only piece of technology that allowed blind people to independently access printed information. As technology progressed, other options became available and overtook the Optacon in prominence.


Is It Time for National Public Radio to Update Its Website?

[Editor's note: The following post is authored by Marc Grossman, Accessibility Specialist, AFB Consulting.] A recent frustrating experience on NPR's website (and iPhone app) prompted the title of this blog post. Allow me to explain. A friend recently shared with me a link to the NPR story, "Blind Student Helps Make Denver Navigable For All." Sounded interesting, so I clicked on the link. The page was mostly accessiblebut certainly could use some


The Sounds of Success

Doesn't everybody love a happy ending? For those who may be afraid of the work it takes to make a dream come true, read our latest CareerConnect Mentor Success Story. Choosing not to let the space between her dreams and reality get in the way, Canadian CareerConnect Mentor Becka deHaan prepared herself to follow her dream to become an award-nominated recording and performing artist. Read the full story here. By visiting CareerConnect Mentor Success


The 2012 Access Awards – We Want to Hear from You!

[Editor's Note: The following post comes from AFB Consulting Accessibility Specialist Marc Grossman.] In 2007, I was asked to join the selection committee to help sort through the nominations for the AFB Access Awards. This award recognizes individuals, corporations, and organizations that eliminate or substantially reduce inequities faced by people who are blind or visually impaired. The names on the list of past recipients is long and distinguished. It includes Apple, Inc., Canon USA, CBS Television, Google, and Walt Disney Parks and Resorts. Recognizing these companies validates their commitment to


AFB Remembers Steve Jobs

AFB, and the vision loss community at large, will miss Steve Jobs. Needless to state, the world would be a very different place today were it not for him. AFB has been a longtime supporter of Apple products, which come fully accessible right out of the box, and presented the company with a 2009 Access Award in recognition. In light of his passing, some AFB staff shared their thoughts on the man and the indelible mark he left on us all. Carl R. Augusto, AFB President and CEO: "Steve Jobs, as a technology pioneer and CEO of Apple, was a longtime champion for people with disabilities. Here at AFB, we have applauded his accomplishments over and over. I speak for all of us when I say we will


Dog Guide Etiquette, From One Who Knows

[Editor's note: The following blog comes from Paige, a Dog Guide here at AFB headquarters. Paige is here to share a few thoughts on what to do when you encounter a visually impaired person and his or her dog guide.] Hi! I'm Paige, and I'm a Dog Guide. You may also hear of us referred to as "Seeing Eye Dogs" and "Guide Dogs," but we do prefer Dog Guides - after all, we're dogs first! Since my master is currently occupied – she's a rather busy womanI'd thought I'd use my down time to discuss what my colleagues and I do for a living. Becausemake no mistakethis is our job, and a pretty darn important one at that. Dog guides are carefully trained service


Expedition Impossible - Behind the Scenes, Episode 9

[Editor's note: the following post originally appeared on Erik Weihenmayer's blog, http://www.touchthetop.com/blog/, and is being republished here with his permission. Among Erik's many notable achievements, he is a CareerConnect mentor as well as the first blind person to reach the summit of Mt. Everest. This summer Erik has been starring in ABC's Expedition Impossible. You can catch the show Thursday nights at 9 EST. Learn more about Erik at his website, http://www.touchthetop.com/.] I couldn't believe it! What the heck just happened?!


Expedition Impossible - Behind the Scenes, Episode 8

Expedition Impossible - Behind the Scenes, Episodes 8 and 9 [Editor's note: the following post originally appeared on Erik Weihenmayer's blog, http://www.touchthetop.com/blog/, and is being republished here with his permission. Among Erik's many notable achievements, he is a CareerConnect mentor as well as the first blind person to reach the summit of Mt. Everest. This summer Erik has been starring in ABC's Expedition Impossible. You can catch the show Thursday nights at 9 EST. Learn more about Erik at his website,


Expedition Impossible - Behind the Scenes, Episode 7

[Editor's note: the following post originally appeared on Erik Weihenmayer's blog, http://www.touchthetop.com/blog/, and is being republished here with his permission. Among Erik's many notable achievements, he is a CareerConnect mentor as well as the first blind person to reach the summit of Mt. Everest. This summer Erik has been starring in ABC's Expedition Impossible. You can catch the show Thursday nights at 9 EST. Learn more about Erik at his website, http://www.touchthetop.com/.] Prior to this episode, a lot of people have been


Expedition Impossible - Behind the Scenes, Episode 6

[Editor's note: the following post originally appeared on Erik Weihenmayer's blog, http://www.touchthetop.com/blog/, and is being republished here with his permission. Among Erik's many notable achievements, he is a CareerConnect mentor as well as the first blind person to reach the summit of Mt. Everest. This summer Erik has been starring in ABC's Expedition Impossible. You can catch the show Thursday nights at 9 EST. Learn more about Erik at his website, http://www.touchthetop.com/.] Another tough stage in Morocco! Lot's of people


Expedition Impossible - Behind the Scenes, Episode 5

[Editor's note: the following post originally appeared on Erik Weihenmayer's blog, http://www.touchthetop.com/blog/, and is being republished here with his permission. Among Erik's many notable achievements, he is a CareerConnect mentor as well as the first blind person to reach the summit of Mt. Everest. This summer Erik has been starring in ABC's Expedition Impossible. You can catch the show Thursday nights at 9 EST. Learn more about Erik at his website, http://www.touchthetop.com/.] Well ABC billed this episode as "A Blind Man's


Expedition Impossible - Behind the Scenes, Episode 4

[Editor's note: the following post originally appeared on Erik Weihenmayer's blog, http://www.touchthetop.com/blog/, and is being republished here with his permission. Among Erik's many notable achievements, he is a CareerConnect mentor as well as the first blind person to reach the summit of Mt. Everest. This summer Erik has been starring in ABC's Expedition Impossible. You can catch the show Thursday nights at 9 EST. Learn more about Erik at his website, http://www.touchthetop.com/.] As you can imagine, Team No Limits was pretty psyched for the stage in the Atlas Mountains! Jeff and


Announcements from AFB

In the spirit of cooperation and collaboration, AFB works with many other agencies in the blindness and low vision fields. These other agencies often share information with us to reach a broader audience. Below are a few of the more recent announcements we've received. To view all announcements, you can visit AFB's Announcements page. REVISED! Light Box This newly revised Light Box has a lighted translucent white work surface, providing a high contrast background for opaque materials and a source of illumination for colored transparent and translucent items. It also includes a dimming control to meet the needs of


Expedition Impossible - Behind the Scenes, Episodes 2 and 3

[Editor's note: the following post originally appeared on Erik Weihenmayer's blog, http://www.touchthetop.com/blog/, and is being republished here with his permission. Among Erik's many notable achievements, he is a CareerConnect mentor as well as the first blind person to reach the summit of Mt. Everest. This summer Erik has been starring in ABC's Expedition Impossible. You can catch the show Thursday nights at 9 EST. Learn more about Erik at his website, http://www.touchthetop.com/.] Episode #2 As promised, here is some more of the backstory on Expedition


Expedition Impossible - Behind The Scenes #1

[Editor's note: the following post originally appeared on Erik Weihenmayer's blog, http://www.touchthetop.com/blog/, and is being republished here with his permission. Among Erik's many notable achievements, he is a CareerConnect mentor as well as the first blind person to reach the summit of Mt. Everest. This summer Erik is starring in ABC's Expedition Impossible. You can catch the show Thursday nights at 9 EST. Learn more about Erik at his website, http://www.touchthetop.com/.] I hope you enjoyed the first episode of


Expedition Impossible - The Race Begins!

[Editor's note: The following post comes courtesy of Erik Weihenmayer, a former middle school teacher turned professional mountain climber, and the first blind person to reach the summit of Mt. Everest. Erik is also a CareerConnect mentor as well as author of Touch the Top of the World: A Blind Man's Journey to Climb Farther than the Eye Can See. This summer Erik is starring in ABC's Expedition Impossible. You can catch the show Thursday nights at 9 EST. Learn more about Erik at his website, http://www.touchthetop.com/.] My


A Pilgrimage to Helen Keller's Birthplace, Part 1

Guest Blogger Helen Selsdon, AFB Archivist I am an English woman who has lived for over twenty years in New York City. Eight of these years have been spent working as the Archivist at the American Foundation for the Blind, where I have organized the over 80,000 items contained in the Helen Keller Archives. I have come to live and breathe Helen and her teacher Annie Sullivan. A few weeks ago I visited Helen Keller's birth place in Tuscumbia, Alabama. It was easily one of the most memorable trips I have ever taken. Period. This trip was a


SPECIAL VALENTINE'S REPORT

AFB Puts Match.com, eHarmony, and Love is Blind to the Accessibility Test By Adrianna Montague-Gray, AFB Communications, and Marc Grossman, AFB Consulting With Valentine's upon usthat time of year when everyone's talking about relationships and datingI was curious about the accessibility of online dating sites, so I asked my colleague Marc Grossman to help me evaluate a few. We didn't do a formal evaluation of each. Instead we looked at the homepages of Match.com, eHarmony, and Love is Blind,