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Browse By Topic: Social Skills

The Right Way to Archive Career History

Last week, a friend encouraged me to submit my resume to a nonprofit organization. She told me its executive director began searching for a new grant writer. Years ago, I would have dreaded the burden of updating my resume, but I was ready for it last week. See, I used to think a resume was a dump for all of my work and educational experience. The more experience I had, the more pages I needed to capture it all. So, I turned in these four- to five-page resumes when I applied for jobs. Ten years ago, I picked up a helpful tip about archiving my career-related history. Credit for this tip goes to


Workplace Holiday Parties: You’ll Need These Independent Living Skills as an Individual Who Is Blind or Visually Impaired

Successful employment and sound independent living skills unquestionably go hand in handif we’re dressed noticeably sharp for work, if we have reliable transportation to and from the office, and if we are consistently on time and prepared for work meetings, we are setting ourselves up for maintaining and advancing in our career. These are the more obvious independent living skills that are work-applicable; what about the independent living skills on display during the holiday season? Wouldn’t it be wise to identify and fine-tune them ahead of time, ensuring they are ready to be confidently utilized during a workplace holiday party,


Intentionally Networking This Holiday Season as One Who Is Blind or Visually Impaired

Decembera wildly busy month threatening to burst the seams of the calendar. Maybe you and your family members are involved in a handful of extracurricular activities and have been invited to celebrate the holidays with a number of individuals and organizationsnot only Christmas with your loved ones or Hanukkah with friends who might as well be family, but also a holiday party with your karate class, an invitation to be the plus-one for your significant other’s workplace celebration, and a New Year’s social with your friends and friends of friends. If you’re not quite sure if you’ll RSVP because you’re more comfortable staying home, you have a lot going on, or you’re exhausted at the mere mention of the month of December, I hear you; I also want to push you


Want to Enhance Your Professional Skills and Gain a Dash of Holiday Cheer? Volunteer!

I don’t know your specific storywhether you’re desperately seeking employment or eagerly seeking advancement in your career fieldbut I firmly believe this counsel applies to us all, regardless of current employment status. The majority of us will have extra time in our schedules come mid to late December, and I think it’s important to decide beforehand how this time will be spent. Of course, plan a few days of rest (self-care and stress management are imperative), visit family and friends (heed these holiday travel tips), and my


Three Traits That Make Blind and Visually Impaired Job Seekers Stand Out

I am amazed whenever I hear stories about fellow, blind and visually impaired individuals who are unstoppable. Personally, I know a few of them, and their accomplishments take my breath away. Let me be more specific: it is their positivity, their work ethic, and their grit that I admire. Those traits seem to be drivers of success. By no means am I saying those are the only meaningful ones, but, in my opinion, blind and visually impaired job seekers with those traits can turn into valuable assets for any organization. Just think for moment. Those of us who are blind or visually impaired learn a killer set of skills. In the course of developing those skills, our mindset develops as well. Where am I going with this? If you are a hiring


Finding Career Opportunities in the Nonprofit Sector As an Employee with Vision Loss

The nonprofit sector of the United States economy is incredibly robust. It contributes about one trillion dollars to the Gross Domestic Product (GDP). It employs about 10 percent of the population as well. Nonprofits need people power as much, if not more than, the for-profit sector. Typically, nonprofit organizations are governed by a board of directors. The nonprofit’s bylaws spell out what committees will function as a part of the board’s work. Usually, board and non-board members volunteer for these committees. I believe nonprofit committee participation is an excellent option for career advancement if


Are You Ready to Make a First Impression?

A long time ago a coach told me, “You only get one chance to make a first impression!” At the time, I believed the phrase applied only to athletics. However, as my eyesight declined, I discovered it applied to every aspect of life, especially where my career and my business opportunities were concerned. Making a first impression can be challenging for anyone. Yes, blindness or visual impairment compounds the issue, but we can control many of the factors which lead to a great first impression. Preparation is the key. Get ready before you step foot into a job fair, a networking event, or even a sales presentation. Use these tips to


Is Asking for Help at Work As an Individual Who Is Blind or Visually Impaired a Sign of Weakness?

How many times this week have you (with a feeling of reluctance, a timid voice, and a cringe on your face) asked someone for help? I recently asked for helpthat is, after I spent an hour attempting to troubleshoot a problem I had with my tablet. After I put my frustrations and stubbornness aside, I called technical support, and my issue was resolved in five quick minutes (by a technician who graciously thanked me for calling). Why didn't I just call and ask for help to begin with? I'm sure you can relate whether sighted or visually impaired. Many of us take pride in being able to figure things out by ourselves and often go to great lengths before having to admit we don't know the answer and succumbing to asking for assistance. I know I sometimes do.


Free Instructional Resources for Preparing Teens Who Are Blind or Visually Impaired for Summer Work

Summer, we’re coming for you! As we anticipate summertime as the beloved sunshine and vacation time, let us also anticipate summertime as the perfect time for our teen clients who are blind and visually impaired to attain work experiences. Whether you are a teacher for students with visual impairments working in the school system and you have but three months left with your teens before summer break begins, or you are a transition specialist who is now gearing up for a summer program, my hope is you can utilize one or more of these lesson series to prepare your clients for successful summer volunteer or paid work. Resources


AFB CareerConnect Message Boards: Why and How to Use Them

As an individual with a visual impairment who is seeking employment, successfully maintaining employment, or ascending the career ladder, you’re no stranger to confronting workplace barriers. The good news is you don’t have to navigate the barriers independently, you can learn from others. It’s true. AFB CareerConnect created a space to support and connect with other professionals with visual impairments. Here’s the space: AFB CareerConnect message boards. Why the Message Boards Are Useful Bring your questions and concerns. Perhaps the topics include


How Can LinkedIn Benefit the Visually Impaired Job Seeker?

Perhaps you are a blind or visually impaired job seeker and you’re ready to create a LinkedIn account or you have a LinkedIn account with an underdeveloped profile and connections. First, you’re going to want to know how to utilize LinkedIn as a person who is blind or visually impaired. Yes, LinkedIn and its general features are accessible! Second, you’ll want to read AFB’s reprinted article


Questions to Ask a Mentor Who Is Also Blind or Visually Impaired

If you could sit down for an hour with any individual who is blind or visually impaired and successfully employed, to ask any career-related mentor advice…I wonder who you’d choose to glean from, and I wonder what questions you would ask. Topics may include his/her education, ongoing training, challenges, skill sets, accommodations, mentorship, transportation, the hiring process, networking, setbacks, disappointments, goals, and both positive and negative experiences. I suppose if I could sit down with an individual who is blind for mentor advice, I would engage one of the


Handling Bullying in School and the Workplace

Unfortunately bullying is an issue within most schools and some workplaces. Why? It seems human nature is wrought with self-consciousness, anger, envy, and pride. When these characteristics aren’t properly identified and skills aren’t learned to handle them appropriately, or when one has been emotionally beaten down for any number of reasons, it can become enticing to put others down in order to build oneself up. Hence, frustrated, wounded, angry, self-critical, or all-together emotionally immature individuals can seek the feeling of dominance found in bullying someone who they think will cower to their authority. Unfortunately, individuals with disabilities are two to three times more likely to be bullied than their nondisabled peers according to the


Unlocking the Potential of Your Social Network

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Sizzlin' Summer Travel Tips to Get Your Rest-From-Work On! (For Individuals Who Are Blind or Visually Impaired)

We made it! We practically made it to summertime that is. I think a vacation is in order. I’m feeling a little warm, how about y’all? Sure we didn’t have to wait until summer to break from work, but with our children on summer vacation and the warm sun shining, I always find summer an inviting time for respite. Where will you vacation this summer? As for me… We are moving to Delaware this month [Another move! This time last year we moved to Texas from Japan.] and have decided to road trip to our destination, stopping in large cities (Dallas, Nashville, D.C., etc.) along the way. Our vacation will include


Benefits of a Strong Social Network

CareerConnect:


We Discuss the Importance of Excellent Social Skills As a Person Who Is Blind or Visually Impaired, But What if We’re Quiet? (Hint: Quiet Is Highly Valuable)

Who else loves Ted Talks? I suppose listening to them is a hobby for me. Now, having recently read Quiet: The Power of Introverts in a World That Can't Stop Talking by Susan Cain, I was eager to watch her Ted Talk: The Power of Introverts. In her book and Ted Talk she explains that Americans (unfortunately) tend to praise and value extroverts over introverts. I agree; we esteem animated, charming, and boisterous people. In my opinion, we


Preparing a Teen Who Is Blind or Visually Impaired with Multiple Disabilities for Work: Utilizing Peers to Provide Guidance in Social Skills

Parents and teachers of teens with visual impairments and multiple disabilities, think back to your 15 year old self. If you’re like most, you cared a great deal about your peers. You cared what they thought about you, you wanted to emulate them, and you desired to fit in. For this reason, if you were told to stop what you were doing because your friends found it unpleasant, there’s a good chance you would discontinue the behavior. Fast forward to today. Most teens, whether sighted, blind, or visually impaired, and with or without accompanying disabilities, care about their peers. Therefore, teachers can train students or peers to provide honest, assertive,


It’s Beginning to Look a Lot Like Time to Sharpen Your Social Media Skills As a Job Seeker with Vision Loss

Continuing with the Top 10 Holiday Hits, I present to you my favorite holiday song paired with my favorite “reputation” advice! You’ve heard it a million times…no, not the song, but that your social media presence matters! Whether you never post on any networking site or forum or if you are a social media guru, there is always room for improvement. Looking for a new job? Trying to grow your professional network? This much and more can be accomplished online by creating the right type of profile. Check out my latest favorite social media “rules” to sharpen your skills this season: Rule #1: Stay


This One Goes Out to the Ones I Love; This One Goes Out to the Ones [Feeling] Left Behind: A Letter to Middle and High School Teens Who Are Blind or Visually Impaired

Hey guys, It’s difficult to formulate my thoughts because all I am doing is singing “This one goes out to the one I love; this one goes out to the one I left behind” in my head; It’s on repeat; make it stop! Do you know that R.E.M song? You might not; it’s an 80’s song and I’m an 80’s child. I’m thinking about that song because, and this might sound insincere but it is not, I really love you middle and high school gals and guys. Man, this is a difficult season and I care about you as you walk through it. I know 90% of you (I made that percentage up, but I aired on the side of caution) feel left behind, out of place, and like you’re not going anywhere.


Self-Confidence Part 2: How to Foster It As a Person Who Is Blind or Visually Impaired

Vince Lombardi stated, “Life’s battles don’t always go to the stronger or faster man. But sooner or later, the man who wins is the one who thinks he can.” Much truth, yes? Consider two interviewees who are similarly qualified. One appears uncertain or apprehensive, while the other confidently and clearly states how he will benefit the company. The “man who thinks he can” is the “man who wins”. But for the naturally timid or the inexperienced, how do you cultivate your confidence? Did you read the KJZZ piece about four teenagers who are blind or visually impaired preparing to hike the Grand Canyon?


Summer Challenge: Get Mentally Fit As a Person With a Disability

Being healthy can mean a lot of different things. It can mean exercising regularly, cutting out the sugary drinks, eating three square salads a day, or even getting enough sleep. When you really think about it, we do a lot to improve our physical health, but what are we doing about our overall well-being? What are we doing to become mentally fit? When work becomes overwhelming and life gets stressful, what are you doing to overcome these obstacles? This week we are challenging you to discover what makes you mentally fit to succeed in any aspect of life. Mental fitness is about keeping your brain and emotional health in the best possible shape. This could


Alexis Read Story: Exploring Forensic Science

You may remember Alexis Read from her previous AFB Our Stories piece under the rehabilitation section. Alexis has recently contacted AFB in an interest to further share stories of her life as a visually impaired employee and community member. Last month Alexis wrote a story detailing the importance of self-advocacy as a person who is blind or visually impaired. The


Engaging in Extracurricular Activities As a Person Who Is Blind or Visually Impaired

Most blind and visually impaired students who attend college receive some type of support services. This often includes student support services, such as those from the student disability center. Such accommodations often include receiving books and other course materials in accessible format, extended time on tests, support with note taking and accessible electronic devices. Students may also receive orientation and mobility services and support from vocational rehabilitation. These services can make it possible for a student to successfully navigate on and around the campus, use available transportation and obtain necessary accommodations in internship


Counting Down to Graduation: February: Finding the Right Job, Part 2

Question: Is there anyone who can give me advice about finding the right job for me? So you’ve started your career search, but you want something more than numbers and stories. Why not connect with a mentor? Why not try networking?! Networking is an excellent way to open up new opportunities, but it can also help you figure out if the career you are interested in is really what you had in mind. Sometimes the best way to learn about a career is to talk to someone who is currently working in that field. This is where having a mentor comes in handy. Mentors have firsthand knowledge of what it takes


New Year's Resolutions: Considerations for Individuals Who Are Blind or Visually Impaired

It's December. There's no shortage of holiday party invitations strewn around my house. Not because we're wildly popular, but because the military has a number of traditional holiday gatherings. It's a busy, hustle-and-bustle month I appreciate, and yet I look forward to the unruffled and uncomplicated month of January. It's hard to believe 2014 is nearly behind us and the new year is right around the corner. You know what that means! While I'm not one to establish official New Years' Resolutions, I am one to take full advantage of the renewed energy I organically attain come January 1. Who's with me? Let's channel the


Looking Back on Our 12 Days of AFB CareerConnect for Job Seekers and Workers Who Are Blind or Visually Impaired

If you didn't stay up with all of the 12 Days of AFB CareerConnect with tips and advice for job seekers who are blind or visually impaired, I wanted to take the time to provide you with a little ESPN Sports Center highlight reel of our own. Each day provided you with new tips, advice, and links to resources that could help with your preparation for employment or that next position. Let us know what you thought about the series and the posts. 12. On the Twelfth Day of AFB CareerConnect, we posted this post from Katy Lewis,


The First Day of AFB CareerConnect: 1 Inspiring Series of Our Stories About Successful People Who Are Blind or Visually Impaired

In continuing our 12 Days of AFB CareerConnect countdown with the First Day of AFB CareerConnect with a dollop of inspiring stories. Here is a riddle just for you. What one thing comes from the north and the south, has eight eyes (but only six of them work), sixteen extremities, four great minds that work in unison ,yet separately, and shares one successful, independent existence? Give up? To learn about one inspiring story head over to AFB CareerConnect’s series on Cooking Without


The Second Day of AFB CareerConnect: 2 Ways to Connect with a Mentor Who Is Blind or Visually Impaired

As the 12 Days of AFB CareerConnect continues with the second day of tips and advice. With the holidays quickly approaching, everyone is excited to spend time with their friends and family, but don’t forget to make time for your mentors. Mentors often play a bigger role in a job seeker’s life than they realize. It is important to thank your mentors for offering their guidance and knowledge of the field. It is even more important to maintain these relationships as we enter into the New Year. Having a mentor can make all of the difference when looking for a new job, but how do you connect with a


The Fifth Day of AFB CareerConnect: 5 Ways to Turn Volunteer Work into Job Experience for Workers Who Are Blind or Visually Impaired

For the fifth day of AFB CareerConnect, we wanted to bring you five ways to turn volunteer work into job experience. The fact is that volunteer experience is important regardless of whether you are employed. But, for those looking for employment, volunteer experience gives a person the opportunity to keep his or her résumécurrent. Besides keeping your résumé current, volunteering offers experience in developing references and connections. Review our tips and advice below on turning volunteer experience into job experience: 5. Treat volunteering like a job, and make the most of your time volunteering. Volunteering can be an


The Eleventh Day of AFB CareerConnect: 11 Profiles of Successful People Who Are Blind or Visually Impaired

We continue the countdown of the 12 Days of AFB CareerConnect, like the 12 Days of Christmas, but with our CareerConnect spin on the countdown. Here is the eleventh day of AFB CareerConnect. Are you still unsure of what career is right for you? Check out these eleven popular real life stories about the professions of CareerConnect mentors! Maybe one of them will give you an itch to learn more. Just click on the job title and off you go! 11 Mentors Profiled on AFB CareerConnect 11.


Holiday Travel Ideas and Tips for Individuals Who Are Blind or Visually Impaired

After working diligently all year, it's quite refreshing to pause during the holiday season and enjoy a hard-earned vacation. Do you prefer the convenience of a cruise, the cost effectiveness of exploring a nearby city, or the enjoyment of visiting family? Whichever you prefer, review these holiday travel ideas and tips for individuals who are blind or visually impaired. If traveling solo or with other non-drivers, search for destinations that offer a variety of appealing experiences within walking distance, a phenomenal public transportation system, or affordable taxi rides. If the idea of traveling with a group is attractive and not off-putting, browse tour


Where Are They Now? Larry Johnson, Author and Presenter Extraordinaire Who is Blind

Remember Larry Johnson from his Our Stories profile? Last time AFB CareerConnect talked with Larry, he told us about his work as a disc jockey, human resources manager, author, and more! But what has Larry been up to recently? Aside from being an accomplished writer, Larry is still active in presentations and workshops. He was the recent keynote speaker at the state convention of the American Council of the Blind of Texas, and he just


The Gift-Giving Guide for a Career-Minded Recipient Who Is Blind or Visually Impaired

'Tis the season for frosty weather, hot cocoa, and gift giving. Maybe you appreciate the frosty weather, adore the hot cocoa, but are anxious about shopping? Do you feel clueless as to what to purchase for your career-minded son or daughter, sibling, spouse, friend, neighbor, or colleague with a visual impairment? It's time to relax; I've done the thinking for you, which means you can spend more time sipping cocoa by the fireplace. Oh, one more thing. While the gift recipient does have a visual impairment, remember he or she is first a person. And people


Aaron Preece, Lessons From Employment Experience at the American Foundation for the Blind

Finding a job or selecting a career path can be a difficult challenge, but job seekers who are blind or visually impaired should not be discouraged. Anyone who is willing to work hard, find available opportunities, and make connections will achieve success. Although it may seem impossible at the time, it is important to remember that there are many other people just like you that have found career success. Internships Internships are an excellent way to gain work experience and make connections. They allow students to gain hands-on experience by working with professionals and provide students a chance to determine which line of work is best for


A Salute to Our CareerConnect Mentors: Disability Mentoring Day

I am currently in Northern California, spreading the message of National Disability Employment Awareness Month (NDEAM). I have a meeting with staff from Lighthouse for the Blind-San Francisco this week, and I am speaking at the California School for the Blind, Cupertino schools, and San Francisco State University. As I make the rounds out here, I am also making time to connect with CareerConnect mentors, AFB contacts, and other impressive people who are blind or visually impaired. I am always preaching the importance of having mentors who are blind or visually impaired and mentors who are not. I want to take this time to salute the CareerConnect mentors who volunteer to respond to queries, questions, and surveys for our program. I know for a fact that they are making a


Celebrating White Cane Safety Day As an Individual Who Is Blind or Visually Impaired

White Cane Safety Day or White Cane Day is celebrated on October 15, and I felt this was the perfect time to tell you about traveling as a person who is blind of visually impaired. I have a white cane nicknamed "Slim" that travels with me everywhere. It isn't always easy, but I wouldn't do it any other way at this point in time. I have been a cane traveler for a number of years now, and it isn't always perfect. I choose to use a heavier and more durable white cane as I travel a lot and my cane takes a beating. Recently, I was traveling through Grand Central Station in New York City when I hit something with my cane. There was


Find Resources, Tips, and Updates Related to Blindness, Visual Impairment, and Employment in Our Newsletter

The American Foundation for the Blind (AFB) CareerConnect staff is excited to unveil the new CareerConnect Newsletter! This newsletter will provide information about updates or changes to the program, introduce new staff or volunteers, share helpful tips, offer options for becoming more engaged in mentoring or the use of the program, and give a peek behind the scenes at AFB’s efforts to expand employment possibilities for people with vision loss. The team has been working hard on this newsletter, and we will be bringing this to you quarterly. Stay tuned to all of the latest news about our program and new resources for job seekers who are


The Secrets to Turning Your Volunteer Job into Paid Work for Job Seekers Who Are Blind or Visually Impaired

Have you heeded the insights of The Work-Related Benefits of Volunteering for Job-Seekers Who Are Blind or Visually Impaired? Did you Find a Volunteer Position that Is a Good Match for You? Good. Now you're volunteering and you like the people, you like the work, you like the cause. Wonderful. Have you considered the possibility of turning your volunteer


Finding Volunteer Positions As an Individual Who Is Blind or Visually Impaired

Did you read the 8 Work-Related Benefits of Volunteering for Job Seekers Who are Blind or Visually Impaired? Did you find yourself saying, "Shannon" (I'm glad you said Shannon, because we're on a first-name basis), "I like the idea of volunteering, but what kind of volunteer position should I get? How do I get a volunteer position?" I'm glad you asked. This blog post is for you. Read through these helpful tips on finding a volunteer position; it's la carte (just like a pick-and-choose hot lunch in


Do Your Coworkers a Favor: Avoid These 6 Common Workplace Annoyances; This Is Not a Blind Thing!

Bad breath. Work environments involve prime breath-smelling distance with coworkers and clients on a daily basis. I've come to understand two primary causes of smelly breath: poor oral hygiene and eating halitosis-inducing foods. Make sure to practice good oral hygiene. I'm going to assume you brush your teeth twice daily and visit the dentist every 6-12 months, and I'm also going to assume you're a lot like me and forget to floss more than you'd care to admit. Let's both prioritize nightly flossing. As for food, I'd suggest skipping garlic and onions in work-day breakfasts and


8 Work-Related Benefits of Volunteering for Job Seekers Who Are Blind or Visually Impaired

Maybe you are among the vast numbers of individuals who are blind or visually impaired who would like to work, but have been unable to find or retain a full-time job. Don't despair. There is something you can do while you searchsomething that will benefit your community (on behalf of those folks, I personally thank you for giving of your time and talents) and you. Read on to learn 8 work-related benefits of volunteering. Obtaining a volunteer position in a career field of interest can help you to qualify for a desired job. For example, if you are looking to work as a child care provider, you may seek a volunteer


Let’s Paws to Reflect: Dog Guide Use in the Employment Process

If you are using screen-reading software, you might have missed a phenomenal pun. Note the canine "P-A-W-S" as a replacement for "P-A-U-S-E." Tell me I'm not the only one smiling! Now on to business… You are on the hunt for a stellar job, or already have a (phenomenal, mediocre, or highly-unfavorable-but-you're-keeping-it) position. Now you are considering a dog guide as an orientation and mobility tool. How well do the two merge: full-time work and a guide dog? I personally have never used a guide dog as a mobility aid; I only have textbook answers. But I'm going to do you a favor and refrain from boring you with


Travel Independently and Interdependently As a Professional Who Is Blind or Visually Impaired

I have been using my orientation and mobility skills in typical and more complicated travel situations a lot lately. You really have to get out there and use your skills to keep them up to a high level. I have been a bit too complacent about my skills lately, and I knew my skills needed some sharpening. I have been putting my skills to the test quite a bit over the past month in New York City and New Jersey. Because I've been in the area doing work and such, I've been taking a lot of trains, subways, and generally navigating through different communities in the New York City area and boroughs. I can tell you that I have become more comfortable with


The Fear of the Foreign: Addressing Unspoken Concerns of Hiring Individuals Who Are Blind or Visually Impaired

I am sitting on the Shinkansen, or bullet train, for a three-and-a-half-hour journey from Tokyo to Misawa after a three-month stint in America. I’ve lived in Japan for two years, and after a mere three months away, I am surprisingly experiencing culture shock once again as I travel home (very jet-lagged, but that’s off topic). Across the front screen of the train, kanji characters are scrolling by, which I assume announce each stop. I don’t read kanji. It’s unfamiliar and my lack of knowledge of the writing system puts me on edge. Will I miss my stop? Other questions running through my mind as I settle back to Japan: When I ask culture-related questions, am I insulting Japanese persons? How different are we? How can we relate? I cannot tell you how helpful it would be


How to Beat Work-Related Stress When You Are Blind or Visually Impaired

If you are an adult, think back to the time in childhood when the idea of working to support yourself seemed novel and fun. You could live on your own, come and go as you please, or eat what you like (maybe that was just my dream, as we were a health food household, and I just wanted Cookie Crisps!). Enter the real world. There is such a thing, John Mayer. It's not quite what we had in mind, huh? Sure, we can live on our own, come and go as we please (well, my two preschool daughters make this complicated), and eat what we want (wouldn't you know it, I eat healthy now, too). There is, however, much more to the real world.


Celebrate Independence Day: Accept Invitations to Work-Related Events Without Stress

Are you somebody who dreads getting an invitation to a work party? Almost all jobs are positions held on a team. It is in the best interest of the entire team to be cohesive and unified. Whenever possible, participate in team-building activities and outings to encourage team unity. If invited to a holiday party or recreational get-together, choose to be a participating member. Your superiors will appreciate your effort and you may find your job satisfaction increasing when you take time to get to know your colleagues. Additionally, view these activities as opportunities to enhance your network relationships and demonstrate your loyalty the


AFB Launches an App for AFB CareerConnect and It's FREE!

You might be excited or just ecstatic that the American Foundation for the Blind (AFB) has just launched the CareerConnect App with some of your favorite features of the CareerConnect resource center. Hold your applause and high-pitched sounds of jubilation for the full deal on this momentous occasion. Am I hyping this app? Oh, yes! But I will tell you that this launch is just the beginning of more great things to come. AFB has worked hard to include some of the new and exciting features that vision professionals, job seekers, youth, and parents of children who are blind or visually impaired use from CareerConnect. The CareerConnect App includes four main tabs, and it follows the model of the