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AFBAmerican Foundation®
for the Blind

Expanding possibilities for people with vision loss

Browse By Topic: Employment

The American Foundation for the Blind's blogs focus on broadening access to technology, employment issues for people who are blind or visually impaired, advocacy on behalf of Americans with vision loss, raising children with disabilities, and more.


AFB Blog

The American Foundation for the Blind is a national organization expanding possibilities for people with vision loss. AFB experts can be found on Capitol Hill ensuring children have the educational materials they need to learn; in board rooms working with technology companies to ensure that their products are fully accessible; and at conferences ensuring professionals who work with people with vision loss have access to the latest research and information. Through our online resources and information center we communicate directly with people experiencing vision loss, and their families, to give them the resources they need to maintain an independent lifestyle. Follow AFB's blog to learn more about our activities.

  • Report From Day One of CES 2018, a Global Technology Event
    by Paul Schroeder on 1/10/2018

    It’s the time for college bowls, NFL playoffs, New Year’s resolutions, and, of course, all things technology at CES in Las Vegas. The show officially kicked off on Tuesday, January 9, 2018, with lots of attention to self-driving vehicles, voice-controlled everything, robots galore, and audio products with hearing enhancement. A big thank you to the Consumer Technology Association for supporting attendance by disability advocates, including Lee Huffman and me. Here are a couple of highlights so far. We’ll have a full wrap up in AccessWorld next month. Alexa in the Shower?

  • How Does the Department of Justice's Withdrawal of Proposed Regulations Change How the ADA Applies to Websites?
    by Elizabeth Neal on 1/3/2018

    On December 26, the Department of Justice (DOJ) officially withdrew pending rulemakings that would have clarified exactly how the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) applies to web services. In 2010, the DOJ started the rulemaking process to create new regulations for the websites of public accommodations and state and local governments. These "Advance Notices of Proposed Rulemaking" (ANPRMs) have now been withdrawn. For two different, but complementary, perspectives on this news, we recommend Lainey Feingold's excellent blog post, No ADA Web Accessibility Regs? No Excuses and the Seyfarth ADA Title III News & Insights

  • New Design for Medicare Cards Raises Accessibility Questions for People Who Are Blind or Visually Impaired
    by Jamie Pauls on 12/4/2017

    In September of this year, the Centers for Medicaid and Medicare Services (CMS) announced that redesigned cards will be issued to all Medicare recipients starting in April of 2018. This project is known as the Social Security Number Removal Initiative (SSNRI). The reason for the change in card design is so that individuals' Social Security numbers can be replaced by a new "Medicare Beneficiary Identifier (MBI)"a unique, randomly assigned series of numbers and upper-case letters for each card holder. The move away from placing Social Security numbers on Medicare cards is


CareerConnect Blog

AFB CareerConnect® is an employment information resource developed by the American Foundation for the Blind for job seekers who are blind or visually impaired. The CareerConnect Blog focuses on employment issues for people who are blind or visually impaired, as well as sharing stories from mentors and other blind people who have found career success.

  • The Right Way to Archive Career History
    by Steve Cardenas on 1/16/2018

    Last week, a friend encouraged me to submit my resume to a nonprofit organization. She told me its executive director began searching for a new grant writer. Years ago, I would have dreaded the burden of updating my resume, but I was ready for it last week. See, I used to think a resume was a dump for all of my work and educational experience. The more experience I had, the more pages I needed to capture it all. So, I turned in these four- to five-page resumes when I applied for jobs. Ten years ago, I picked up a helpful tip about archiving my career-related history. Credit for this tip goes to

  • New Article Subsides Your Apprehensions About Working Alongside an Employee Who Is Blind or Visually Impaired
    by Shannon Carollo on 12/27/2017

    You’re considering hiring an individual who is blind or visually impaired, or there’s a new hire who has a visual impairment at your workplace. You’re concerned and sweaty-palmedand that’s an understatement. We hear youyou’ve likely no familiarity with people who have vision lossand we are thankful that in lieu of allowing inexperience and hesitation to dictate your verdict, you are in search of knowledge. We’re here to educate you and address your reservations, which we’re confident will subside your apprehensions. Your Possible Concerns and the Article Addressing Them If you’re like most, the questions you have include: What is a visual impairment? How should I act around an individual with a visual

  • Considering the Pursuit of a Degree? New Article Addresses the Impact of College on Employment Rates and Earnings
    by Shannon Carollo on 12/19/2017

    Ladies and gentleman of the jury, I recognize you have a weighty decision upon your shouldersdo you or do you not pursue a postsecondary education to include a vocational/trade school or traditional college? Perhaps you’re soon to complete high school and you have the work vs. additional school choice on the horizon. Or maybe you went straight to the workforce after high school and you wonder if now is the time for a degree. Regardless, as you are aware, the decision isn’t one size fits all and depends on your career goals. To help you make a wise decision, might I suggest an


Other Blogs From the American Foundation for the Blind


FamilyConnect: A Parent's Voice

This blog is for you—parents of children with visual impairments. We talk about what it's like to be a parent, how to advocate for your child, what new resources we've found, and much more. FamilyConnect also periodically invites experts in all different aspects of raising a visually impaired child to make themselves available to answer your questions.


Raising a Child Who Is Blind and...

I am the mother of three and my middle child, Eddie, is officially the "Special Needs Child." Here is my blog to share the joy and pain of having such a unique child.


VisionAware Blog

Timely news and interviews relating to vision loss, including the latest updates in medical research.


Visually Impaired: Now What?

Formerly known as the "Peer Perspectives Blog," we have renamed the blog to reflect the purpose more accurately. The posts are written by our team of peer advisors, many of whom are professionals in the field who are blind or visually impaired. The blog features solutions for living with visual impairment resulting from eye conditions such as macular degeneration, glaucoma, diabetic retinopathy, and retinitis pigmentosa. It includes posts about living independently, getting around, low vision, technology, cooking, and helpful products.