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Blindness and Depression - A question

Hi, I am currently writing a book where the protagonist is a child blinded around 3 years old. The story takes place when he is around 13 years old. Im wondering if its possible he would still have memories of vision either consciously or subconsciously(while dreaming). Also more importantly Im wondering if depression is common among those born blind and exactly how it manifests. Since they are not dealing with the loss of something (like those suffering from blindness late in life) id imagine the depression to be a social anxiety? Please let me know if you have any experience with these questions and we can have a chat online. Thankyou very much!

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Re:Blindness and Depression - A question



There's a Chinese adage, it's "when God is vacant to produce you an valuable task, he will test your strength by giving you many challenges in your life, get on to you hungry, get on to you tire physically, in order to think it over if you are competent of responsibility something great" something like in western culture "when god close a entrance, he will commence a window pro you" solely be inflicted with to live strong!! And live your life to the most. There are permanently vacant to be inflicted with other public who are more awkward than us.
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Re:Blindness and Depression - A question



Painful thoughts such as “I am worthless” “I’m alone,” “I am nobody” will make you feel sad. Please try to think in a productive way such as “I’m representing others like me or possibly human beings to face obstacles,” “I will be a better person because of this” or “I am teaching others what it is like to lose eye-sight.”
Psychosocial therapy; it’s important for you to socialize as much as you can even through this message board.
You may say, “Doctor, it’s easy to say.” But I sincerely hope you will feel you can be responsible for your happiness a little by little. I am quite busy and cannot guarantee I can reply soon all the time, but if you have more questions or say “painful thoughts”, I may be able to try to help you have productive so=called positive thoughts. check http://www.antidepressantscomparison.com


Re:Blindness and Depression - A question



I feel very pity on the child...Blind people or any person who lacks any of the five senses has got a depression already..So it is still possible for the care taker to take his responsibility very faithfully and get him treated as soon as possible...Check out the websites related to depression...I have gone through one of the websites..you can also have a look at it and I am sure that you would find it useful http://www.indepression.com/
Thanks,
Bryan.


Re:Blindness and Depression - A question



Dear Stephanie,

I, too, am legally blind and a co-worker of Joe Strechay. I wholeheartedly concur with the remarks made above in his post, especially the recommendation that you become a client of your state or private rehab agency if you are not one already.

For a great example of how people with vision loss work successfully as librarians, check out this link:
http://www.afb.org/Section.asp?SectionID=7&TopicID...

If you are interested in having me share your thoughts with a select number of CareerConnect Mentors, please write me at dbannister@afb.net.

Best wishes,
Detra Bannister, AFB CareerConnect Program Specialist


Re:Blindness and Depression - A question



Hello there!

I want to offer some resources and such. I am sorry that you are going through such a tough time. I think a lot of persons who go through any type of loss experience some sort of coping issues as part of their adjustment process. No one can tell you they know exactly how you feel, but many people can tell you they have felt similar to you. I work in the AFB CareerConnect program and I also am a person with a visual impairment. I can recall going through a period of darkness or depression. I sought counseling and it made a difference for me. I can not say that it solves issues, but helped me deal with them better. It aided me in evaluating my situation and planning where to go from there. This is not everyone's path, but was part of mine.

On the employment side of your post: AFB CareerConnect features mentors who are successfully employed persons who are visually impaired in many fields. You can search by field in the "For Job Seekers" section of the site. The site is www.afb.org/cc or you can find it by going to www.afb.org. There are "Success Stories" from mentors that you can read. You can read content on professions and finding employment. AFB.org offers many other resources that can be utilized to better inform persons about visual impairments, resources and more. You can contact mentors through a safe corresponding system like email through our AFB CareerConnect program; register and contact mentors!

If you are not a client of vocational rehabilitation in your area; I would truly suggest that you look into this. They will be a great resource and offer knowledge on resources in your locality. They can possibly recommend support groups, consumer groups, and vocational counseling from trained competent persons. You can search for your local state rehabilitation agency through afb.org. The two major consumer groups are the National Federation of the Blind (NFB) and the American Council of the Blind (ACB). I would suggest finding a chapter in your local area. I found that meeting other persons who are visually impaired was very helpful in the coping process.

Some other resources to check out:
www.hadley.edu which offers free correspondence courses for persons who are visually impaired.
www.gettinghired.com which is employment site for persons with disabilities.
www.esight.org is a good resource to check out.
www.afb.org Check out all the resources and content available.

Just remember, you are not alone and can connect with people who have gone through similar situations or dealt with similar issues. We are all out here and willing to offer advice and support. There are many successful persons who are blind and visually impaired who were born visually impaired or who had a loss of vision later in life.

A big step is seeking help and advice and you have made that first step. Mentors are important in our life whether visually impaired or not. I have mentors who helped me deal with my visual impairment and who helped me see that successful employment is an option. Ihave mentors who have guided me in my career as well. It is important to have a variety of mentors.

Life is about seizing opportunities and overcoming obstacles; some obstacles are bigger than others or seem impossible to traverse, but we are all the stronger if we do succeed.

Joe Strechay; AFB CareerConnect Project Associate


Re:Blindness and Depression - A question



Hi Stephanie,
I am a board certified psychiatrist. As you can suppose, I have seen people who suffer from depression daily. It is not ethical for me to try to treat you as my client through this but if I may, I would like to help you or encourage you as much as I can.
To cope with depression, a medication management is one thing. You could see a psychiatrist locally. You could see a counselor locally but it seems you do not have SSI and I wonder if you have Medicaid or Medicare.
However, there are many things you can do to help yourself.
Behavioral therapy; to have routines or to stay busy is very important. To do things according to time, such as going to a library at 9, seeing a friend at 10, singing a song at 11 and so on. To exercise is extremely important. When you exercise, your brain produces a hormone endorphin, which will make you feel good. The YWCA in Spokane used to have swimming lessons for the disabled including the blind and I used to volunteer to swim with them.
Cognitive therapy; I think this is most important for you. This is based on the fact how you feel depends on what you think, but you are not always aware of your own thoughts. If you feel depressed, ask yourself, what have I just thought? Painful thoughts such as “I am worthless” “I’m alone,” “I am nobody” will make you feel sad. Please try to think in a productive way such as “I’m representing others like me or possibly human beings to face obstacles,” “I will be a better person because of this” or “I am teaching others what it is like to lose eye-sight.”
Psychosocial therapy; it’s important for you to socialize as much as you can even through this message board.
You may say, “Doctor, it’s easy to say.” But I sincerely hope you will feel you can be responsible for your happiness a little by little. I am quite busy and cannot guarantee I can reply soon all the time, but if you have more questions or say “painful thoughts”, I may be able to try to help you have productive so=called positive thoughts.
Take care.


Re:Blindness and Depression - A question



Stephanie, your post broke my heart. I am sorry that you are struggling with these questions right now. I thought that you might find this article and the embedded video (it's described and captioned) helpful:
http://www.afb.org/seniorsite.asp?SectionID=63&Top...

And in particular, I wonder if you have explored AFB CareerConnect for help in figuring out your future plans? I searched the mentor database for the keyword "library" and found 38 results:
http://www.afb.org/CareerConnect/users/member_srch...

I hope that one of the mentors will be able to brainstorm with you and give you some hope for a productive future in your chosen career. Good luck to you -- librarians are some of my favorite people, and I am rooting for you. Please keep us posted.


Re:Blindness and Depression - A question



there's a Chinese saying, it's "when God is going to give you an important task, he will test your strength by giving you many challenges in your life, make you hungry, make you tire physically, in order to see if you are capable of doing something great" something like in western culture "when god close a door, he will open a window for you" just have to live strong!! and live your life to the maximum. There are always going to have other people who are more unfortunate than us.


Re:Blindness and Depression - A question



I can truly relate to the post regarding depression. I have been struggling with vision loss and an undiagnoses vision condition for almost 10 years now. I was finally diagnosed with a very rare eye disease (Corneal Limbal Stem Cell Deficiency) in both eyes in July of 2009 and have finally come to terms with the reality that I am losing my sight (my sight has greatly, greatly decreased since 2006). Since my diagnosis and my prognosis (treatment includes experimental stem cell transplants and, perhaps, corneal transplants), I have felt depressed. As someone who grew up in a family in which my mother had clinical depression and having dealt with it before my vision loss, its only been made worse since losing sight.

I know I shouldn't, but I often wonder why I was chosen to experience a rare condition and lose my sight during my twenties. I love to read books and I am pursuing a Masters degree in Library and Information Science, but am depressed about my future. Who will want to hire a visually impaired or blind library director or librarian?

I've never wanted to kill myself, yet sometimes I feel absolutely worthless.


Re:Blindness and Depression - A question



My mother has retinitis pigmentosa and over the last two years lost almost all of her vision. As a result of her vision loss she has fallen into a deep depression. She is not motivated at all to learn any coping skills and relies on my father for everything. She is living in fear and my family does not know what to do to help her. Does anyone have any suggestions about how we can help her feel some hope for her life again?


Re:Blindness and Depression - A question



I am sorry to hear your wife is losing her sight in her eye due to a tumor. You are being supportive by doing what you are, reaching out and asking for advice. In a sense I feel she is lucky, she has time to come to terms with it, and she still will have the sight in her other eye, there are others who don't. It's the last part that kept me grateful when I awoke a year a 2 days ago blind in my left eye due to an accident. At first I felt sorry for mysel, But then I praised God I could still see.


Re:Blindness and Depression - A question



I'm in the DC area. My wife is 31 and is going blind because of a growing tumor on her optic nerve. I am struggling to understand what she's going through. Can someone please help me with some literature or some kind of group that can help me be a better husband and better support her through this?

Thank you for any help at all.


Re:Blindness and Depression - A question



Do you think we could talk more? you can email me at ricky.cisco@gmail.com - thank you very much for responding.


Re:Blindness and Depression - A question



Well, someone who is blinded close to birth won't remember much. however, they could remember some things subconsciously and not understand what they are seeing. At least that is how it's like for me. I would have dreams and every so often I could see the sky or I could see myself sitting on the grass. It's really kind of scary at times. Also, there are those who have depression. Sometimes it's out of self pity, other times it can be because of doesn't understand me and I go to a school where I don't have any help. this leads me to feel lonely and sad. I guess there are many reasons for depression, but that is just why I have mine. condition. I have depression because my family


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