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for the Blind

Expanding possibilities for people with vision loss

How to cope with vision loss

Hi All,

My Father has had limited vision for his entire life. Over the last few years it has gotten significantly worse. While he has been legally blind for many years his vision is just now reaching the point where he is no longer able to do many of the things he use to do on his own. This loss of independence is causing some serious depression and I am wondering if there are therapists or support groups that would be able to help him to deal with the new challenges he faces? We are located in northern NJ.

Any help or advice would be greatly appreciated.

Thanks!
Doug (Bob's Son)


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Re: How to cope with vision loss



People with visual impairment find it difficult to navigate through large indoor places for the simple reason that the obstacles are difficult to spot and navigating through them is even tougher. Taking assistance to find exit and other places is absolutely normal and there should not be any hesitancy from both the ends.

Though to make mobility easier and less stressful there are a lot of adaptive equipment available today in the market. One such patent pending product is Live Braille Mini which totally makes them independent. It can be worn on your finger and through its hap-tic feedback in the form of vibrations, navigation can be made simpler.

I would like to see this device in the hands of every visually impaired people who are fighting everyday to commute to places.

VIsit www.livebraille.com

(This post was edited by the author on 11/15/2016 at 6:22 AM)


resource for those with vision loss



www.visionaware.org and http://hadley.edu/SeminarDetails.asp?sid=203 which is a Hadley School for the Blind seminar about being independent with vision loss. The more choices in life your dad has, and the more opportunities he makes for himself, the better he will be at keeping depressed feelings at bay. Volunteering also helps folks get a sense of how well they can do in the world, no matter their vision.


Re: How to cope with vision loss



Since I don't have any real idea of what activities your dad is doing less, here are some general suggestions.
Please be sure he knows of a good local cab service. By "good" I mean one who will pick him up on time as long as he is courteous and puts in his time call beforehand.
This is what I do if I know I need a cab at noon tomorrow to go to a gathering of some sort. I call ahead and then call an hour before I want to leave and remind dispatch of my time call.
This way, you help your dad travel independently safely.
He may need more instruction on how to get around using a cane or may be considering partnering with a guide dog. Since you are in New Jersey, he can easily arrange with Seeing Eye to explore the guide dog possibility. They can be reached at 973-539-4425.
For cane use, he probably needs to register with the N.J. Commission for the Blind and work with a Mobility Instructor.
If your dad has access to a computer, he can participate in online courses for free from hadley.edu designed with blind people in mind. The website contains a catalog of possibilities. Some of the courses deal with how to adjust to vision loss -- physically and also psychologically. He may find them useful.
As for depression, you and he may find the following website and the resources it provides of value.
www.undoingdepression.com and if your dad has access to BARD Richard O'Connor's book Undoing Depression is available in audio format. Another of his books, rewiring, is available through bookshare. Your dad may truly enjoy subscribing to bookshare (see bookshare.org) where he can read books in audio, large print or braille formats.


Re: How to cope with vision loss



Since I don't have any real idea of what activities your dad is doing less, here are some general suggestions.
Please be sure he knows of a good local cab service. By "good" I mean one who will pick him up on time as long as he is courteous and puts in his time call beforehand.
This is what I do if I know I need a cab at noon tomorrow to go to a gathering of some sort. I call ahead and then call an hour before I want to leave and remind dispatch of my time call.
This way, you help your dad travel independently safely.
He may need more instruction on how to get around using a cane or may be considering partnering with a guide dog. Since you are in New Jersey, he can easily arrange with Seeing Eye to explore the guide dog possibility. They can be reached at 973-539-4425.
For cane use, he probably needs to register with the N.J. Commission for the Blind and work with a Mobility Instructor.
If your dad has access to a computer, he can participate in online courses for free from hadley.edu designed with blind people in mind. The website contains a catalog of possibilities. Some of the courses deal with how to adjust to vision loss -- physically and also psychologically. He may find them useful.
As for depression, you and he may find the following website and the resources it provides of value.
www.undoingdepression.com and if your dad has access to BARD Richard O'Connor's book Undoing Depression is available in audio format. Another of his books, rewiring, is available through bookshare. Your dad may truly enjoy subscribing to bookshare (see bookshare.org) where he can read books in audio, large print or braille formats.


Re: How to cope with vision loss



First, you have come to a place where you and your father can get assistance. Please be more specific about the things your father can do less well now that he has lost more vision. Lots of us do lots of things with no vision at all. Perhaps we can help him out.


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