Skip to Content

Home >  JVIB >  Object Permanence, Reaching, and Locomotion in Infants Who Are Blind — JVIB Abstract

Object Permanence, Reaching, and Locomotion in Infants Who Are Blind — JVIB Abstract

Abstract: This article reviews research and other work that suggests that congenital total blindness during infancy retards motor functions, most notably reaching for sound-making stimuli. Since there is a correlation between when infants who are blind begin to reach for rattles, bells, and the like and when sighted infants search for hidden toys in Piagetian experiments, it has been argued that for sound cues alone to elicit reaching, infants must first develop an object concept. Problems with this formulation are highlighted, and an alternative explanation is proposed that suggests possible interventions to redress the effects of congenital blindness on development.


There are 0 comments on this article.

Please log in if you wish to make a comment.

If you are a JVIB subscriber, please log in below. If you are an AER member, JVIB is part of your membership benefit: please visit AER's website to access JVIB.








Not yet a subscriber? Here are some options:
Subscribe
Purchase this individual article

Prefer not to subscribe?
Read FREE JVIB content or check out what JVIB has to offer.

services iconComment on JVIB Articles

Sign in to use the new comment-on-this-article feature!

services iconAdvertising

Reach and Match: Keeping in Touch.  Empowers children with all abilities and promotes inclusion.

Low Vision Simulators Plus VSRT (Pepper) Test LUV Reading Workbook