Updated September 2020

Educational Program Attendance

Data from the American Printing House for the Blind

Primary Reading Medium

Data from the American Printing House for the Blind


Educational Program Attendance (2018 APH Data)

According to the 2019 Annual Report from the American Printing House for the Blind (APH), based upon data from January of 2018, of the 57,240 children, youth, and adults who are legally blind in educational settings below the college level, approximately 8% (4,462) are registered by residential schools for the blind, 84% (46,154) are registered by state departments of education, 6% (3,426) are registered by rehabilitation programs, and 2% (1,180) are registered by multiple disability programs.

Definition and scope: The students referred to range in age from 0-21 years as well as certain qualifying adult students and only include those students with vision loss that function at/meet the legal definition of blindness. Legal blindness is a level of vision loss that has been defined by law to determine eligibility for benefits. It refers to explicitly to those who have a central visual acuity of 20/200 or less in the better eye with the best possible correction, or a visual field of 20 degrees or less.

Data source: 2019 Annual Report: American Printing House for the Blind, Inc. http://www.aph.org/annual-reports. The American Printing House for the Blind maintains an annual register of people who are legally blind in educational settings below the college level.
Read our brief resource guide to APH data.


Primary Reading Medium (2018 APH Data)

According to the 2019 Annual Report from the American Printing House for the Blind (APH), of the 57,240 children, youth, and adults who are legally blind in educational settings, approximately 8% (4,617) of legally blind students use braille as their primary reading medium, 33% (18,172) primarily use vision, 10% (5,626) are primarily auditory readers, 18% (10,022) are pre-readers, and 30% (16,812) are symbolic or non-readers.

Definition and scope: The students referred to range in age from 0-21 years as well as certain qualifying adult students and only include those students with vision loss that function at/meet the legal definition of blindness. Legal blindness is a level of vision loss that has been defined by law to determine eligibility for benefits. It refers to explicitly to those who have a central visual acuity of 20/200 or less in the better eye with the best possible correction, or a visual field of 20 degrees or less.

Data source: 2019 Annual Report: American Printing House for the Blind, Inc. http://www.aph.org/annual-reports. The American Printing House for the Blind maintains an annual register of people who are legally blind in educational settings below the college level.


Educational Program Attendance (2017 APH Data)

According to the 2018 Annual Report from the American Printing House for the Blind (APH), based upon data from January of 2017, of the 65,518 children, youth, and adults who are legally blind in educational settings below the college level, approximately 8% (4,994) are registered by residential schools for the blind, 84% (53,551) are registered by state departments of education, 6% (3,628) are registered by rehabilitation programs, and 2% (1,328) are registered by multiple disability programs.

Definition and scope: The students referred to range in age from 0-21 years as well as certain qualifying adult students and only include those students with vision loss that function at/meet the legal definition of blindness. Legal blindness is a level of vision loss that has been defined by law to determine eligibility for benefits. It refers to explicitly to those who have a central visual acuity of 20/200 or less in the better eye with the best possible correction, or a visual field of 20 degrees or less.

Data source: 2018 Annual Report: American Printing House for the Blind, Inc. http://www.aph.org/annual-reports. The American Printing House for the Blind maintains an annual register of people who are legally blind in educational settings below the college level.
Read our brief resource guide to APH data.


Primary Reading Medium (2017 APH Data)

According to the 2018 Annual Report from the American Printing House for the Blind (APH), of the 65,518 children, youth, and adults who are legally blind in educational settings, approximately 8% (5,011) of legally blind students use braille as their primary reading medium, 33% (20,682) primarily use vision, 11% (7,283) are primarily auditory readers, 17% (10,923) are pre-readers, and 31% (19,602) are symbolic or non-readers.

Definition and scope: The students referred to range in age from 0-21 years as well as certain qualifying adult students and only include those students with vision loss that function at/meet the legal definition of blindness. Legal blindness is a level of vision loss that has been defined by law to determine eligibility for benefits. It refers to explicitly to those who have a central visual acuity of 20/200 or less in the better eye with the best possible correction, or a visual field of 20 degrees or less.

Data source: 2018 Annual Report: American Printing House for the Blind, Inc. http://www.aph.org/annual-reports. The American Printing House for the Blind maintains an annual register of people who are legally blind in educational settings below the college level.


Educational Program Attendance (2016 APH Data)

According to the 2017 Annual Report from the American Printing House for the Blind (APH), based upon data from January of 2016, of the 63,357 children, youth, and adults who are legally blind in educational settings below the college level, approximately 8% (4,940) are registered by residential schools for the blind, 84% (53,155) are registered by state departments of education, 6% (3,800) are registered by rehabilitation programs, and 2% (1,462) are registered by multiple disability programs.

Definition and scope: The students referred to range in age from 0-21 years as well as certain qualifying adult students and only include those students with vision loss who are legally blind in educational settings below the college level. Legal blindness is a level of vision loss that has been defined by law to determine eligibility for benefits. It refers to explicitly to those who have a central visual acuity of 20/200 or less in the better eye with the best possible correction, or a visual field of 20 degrees or less.

Data source: 2017 Annual Report: American Printing House for the Blind, Inc. http://www.aph.org/annual-reports. The American Printing House for the Blind maintains an annual register of people who are legally blind in educational settings below the college level.
Read our brief resource guide to APH data.


Primary Reading Medium (2016 APH Data)

According to the 2017 Annual Report from the American Printing House for the Blind (APH), of the 63,357 children, youth, and adults who are legally blind in educational settings, approximately 8% (4,942) of legally blind students use braille as their primary reading medium, 32% (20,464) primarily use vision, 11% (6,843) are primarily auditory readers, 16% (10,391) are pre-readers, and 33% (20,718) are symbolic or non-readers.

Definition and scope: The students referred to range in age from 0-21 years as well as certain qualifying adult students and only include those students with vision loss who are legally blind in educational settings below the college level. Legal blindness is a level of vision loss that has been defined by law to determine eligibility for benefits. It refers to explicitly to those who have a central visual acuity of 20/200 or less in the better eye with the best possible correction, or a visual field of 20 degrees or less.

Data source: 2017 Annual Report: American Printing House for the Blind, Inc. http://www.aph.org/annual-reports. The American Printing House for the Blind maintains an annual register of people who are legally blind in educational settings below the college level.


Educational Program Attendance (2015 APH Data)

According to the 2016 Annual Report from the American Printing House for the Blind (APH), based upon data from January of 2015, of the 62,528 children who are legally blind in educational settings below the college level, approximately 8% (5,116) are registered by residential schools for the blind, 83% (52,003) are registered by state departments of education, 6% (3,860) are registered by rehabilitation programs, and 3% (1,549) are registered by multiple disability programs.

Definition and scope: The students referred to range in age from 0-21 years as well as certain qualifying adult students and only include those students with vision loss who are legally blind in educational settings. Legal blindness is a level of vision loss that has been defined by law to determine eligibility for benefits. It refers to explicitly to those who have a central visual acuity of 20/200 or less in the better eye with the best possible correction, or a visual field of 20 degrees or less.

Data source: 2016 Annual Report: American Printing House for the Blind, Inc. http://www.aph.org/annual-reports. The American Printing House for the Blind maintains an annual register of people who are legally blind in educational settings below the college level.
Read our brief resource guide to APH data.


Primary Reading Medium (2015 APH Data)

According to the 2016 Annual Report from the American Printing House for the Blind (APH), based upon data from January of 2015, of the 62,528 children, youth, and adults who are legally blind in educational settings below the college level, approximately 8% (5,127) of legally blind students use braille as their primary reading medium, 32% (19,696) primarily use vision, 11% (6,690) are primarily auditory readers, 16% (10,192) are pre-readers, and 33% (20,822) are symbolic or non-readers.

Definition and scope: The students referred to range in age from 0-21 years as well as certain qualifying adult students and only include those students with vision loss who are legally blind in educational settings below the college level. Legal blindness is a level of vision loss that has been defined by law to determine eligibility for benefits. It refers to explicitly to those who have a central visual acuity of 20/200 or less in the better eye with the best possible correction, or a visual field of 20 degrees or less.

Data source: 2015 Annual Report: American Printing House for the Blind, Inc. http://www.aph.org/annual-reports. The American Printing House for the Blind maintains an annual register of people who are legally blind in educational settings below the college level.


Educational Program Attendance (2014 APH Data)

According to the 2015 Annual Report from the American Printing House for the Blind (APH), based upon data from January of 2014, of the 61,739 children, youth, and adults who are legally blind in educational settings below the college level, approximately 8% (5,196) are registered by residential schools for the blind, 83% (51,271) are registered by state departments of education, 6% (3,659)are registered by rehabilitation programs, and 3% (1,613) are registered by multiple disability programs.

Definition and scope: The students referred to range in age from 0-21 years as well as certain qualifying adult students and only include those students with vision loss who are legally blind in educational settings below the college level. Legal blindness is a level of vision loss that has been defined by law to determine eligibility for benefits. It refers to explicitly to those who have a central visual acuity of 20/200 or less in the better eye with the best possible correction, or a visual field of 20 degrees or less.

Data source: 2015 Annual Report: American Printing House for the Blind, Inc. http://www.aph.org/annual-reports. The American Printing House for the Blind maintains an annual register of people who are legally blind in educational settings below the college level.
Read our brief resource guide to APH data.


Primary Reading Medium (2014 APH Data)

According to the 2015 Annual Report from the American Printing House for the Blind (APH), based upon data from January of 2014, of the 61,739 children, youth, and adults who are legally blind in educational settings below the college level, approximately 9% (5,310) of legally blind students use braille as their primary reading medium, 31% (19,139) primarily use vision, 9% (5,803) are primarily auditory readers, 17% (10,496) are pre-readers, and 34% (21,053) are symbolic or non-readers.

Definition and scope: The students referred to range in age from 0-21 years as well as certain qualifying adult students and only include those students with vision loss who are legally blind in educational settings below the college level. Legal blindness is a level of vision loss that has been defined by law to determine eligibility for benefits. It refers to explicitly to those who have a central visual acuity of 20/200 or less in the better eye with the best possible correction, or a visual field of 20 degrees or less.

Data source: 2015 Annual Report: American Printing House for the Blind, Inc. http://www.aph.org/annual-reports. The American Printing House for the Blind maintains an annual register of people who are legally blind in educational settings below the college level.


Information about the American Printing House Federal Quota Census is available in the Federal Quota section of the APH website.