Stephanie Enyart, AFB’s Chief Public Policy and Research Officer:

Stephanie Enyart, AFB Chief Public Policy and Research Officer

Tim Elder, attorney, wearing a suit and tie, smiling. He stands in front of a shelf full of legal books.

Tim Elder is a California-based civil rights attorney, founder of the TRE Legal Practice, and father of three. Active in the blindness community, he has taken on various roles with the National Federation of the Blind (NFB) and is an avid musician and reader. AFB spoke with Tim recently about the 30th anniversary of the Americans with Disabilities Act and its impact on his life. This interview was edited for brevity and clarity.

Photo of Kirk Adams

I was 29 years old when the Americans with Disabilities Act was signed into law. I was working in finance – only later in my career would I enter the non-profit sector – so at that time, I was largely unaware of its passing.

Photo of Kirk Adams

“I was five years old when I lost my vision,” begins Kirk Adams’ essay published in the November 1 edition of the Seattle Times. The op-ed is an autobiographical account of Kirk’s own employment journey, interspersed with the employment-driven initiatives being undertaken by the American Foundation for the Blind.

AFB Director of Knowledge Advancement Programs Megan Aragon was recently a guest on the Reid My Mind podcast. She discusses her own journey with blindness, the advent of the Blind Leaders Development Program, and other assorted topics. The episode is titled “The Making of Blind Leaders.”

The American Foundation for the Blind (AFB) is delighted to announce that our President and CEO, Kirk Adams, was awarded his doctorate in Leadership and Change from Antioch University on August 3.

As a means of consuming literature, learning, and communicating, braille has remained the biggest game changer in the history of inventions for people who are blind. It is only fitting then, that we celebrate the United Nations' recent resolution designating January 4 of every year as World Braille Day.

AFB’s Huntington office has a holiday tradition dating back the last several years that allows us to better and more fully connect with our community. Every December, the staff throws a modest holiday party—either a catered lunch or a visit to a local restaurant. The party includes a gift exchange, where we previously all put our names into a hat and drew a colleague’s name, then that colleague receives the gift at the party.

This week we lost a legendary figure in the field of comic books and entertainment, Stan Lee. Among the many characters he helped develop for Marvel Comics is the first blind superhero, Daredevil.

About his visually impaired crime-fighter, Lee said: