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AFBAmerican Foundation®
for the Blind

Expanding possibilities for people with vision loss

Blogs

The American Foundation for the Blind's blogs focus on broadening access to technology, employment issues for people who are blind or visually impaired, advocacy on behalf of Americans with vision loss, raising children with disabilities, and more.


AFB Blog

The American Foundation for the Blind is a national organization expanding possibilities for people with vision loss. AFB experts can be found on Capitol Hill ensuring children have the educational materials they need to learn; in board rooms working with technology companies to ensure that their products are fully accessible; and at conferences ensuring professionals who work with people with vision loss have access to the latest research and information. Through our online resources and information center we communicate directly with people experiencing vision loss, and their families, to give them the resources they need to maintain an independent lifestyle. Follow AFB's blog to learn more about our activities.

  • Make Vision a Focus for Healthy Vision Month
    by AFB Staff on 5/21/2018

    Editor's note: The National Eye Institute (NEI) has proclaimed May as Healthy Vision Month.— and the National Eye Institute (NEI) needs your help to Make Vision a Focus! Did you know more than 23 million American adults have never had an eye exam? Getting regular eye exams can catch vision problems early, when they may be easier to treat. That’s why NEI is interested in making vision health a priority, by encouraging adults to take action to protect their vision and inspiring health professionals to continue teaching the importance of vision care. In conjunction with this

  • Inclusion for All: Celebrating Global Accessibility Awareness Day 2018
    by AFB Staff on 5/17/2018

    Thursday, May 17, marks the seventh Global Accessibility Awareness Day (GAAD), the purpose of which is to get everyone talking, thinking, and learning about digital access/inclusion and people with different disabilities. Every year on this day, AFB takes this opportunity to share our own resources to get the public thinking about accessibility. This year, we put together a free webinar to commemorate the day, featuring presentations by Cristopher Broyles, Chief Consulting Solutions Officer;

  • Engage at Every Age: This Year's Older American's Month Theme
    by Priscilla Rogers on 5/9/2018

    Editor's note: Every May, the Administration on Aging, part of the Administration for Community Living, leads our nation's observance of Older American's Month. The 2018 theme, "Engage at Every Age," emphasizes that you are never too old (or young) to take part in activities that can enrich your physical, mental, and emotional well-being. It also celebrates the many ways in which older adults make a difference in our communities. Creating a World With No Limits for Older Persons with Vision Loss The theme of this year's Older American's Month could not be more appropriate to the work that the American Foundation for the Blind is


CareerConnect Blog

AFB CareerConnect® is an employment information resource developed by the American Foundation for the Blind for job seekers who are blind or visually impaired. The CareerConnect Blog focuses on employment issues for people who are blind or visually impaired, as well as sharing stories from mentors and other blind people who have found career success.

  • Christina Holtzclaw Uses Her Career to Empower People with Disabilities
    by Empish J. Thomas on 4/30/2018

    For the last 14 years, Christina Holtzclaw has worked tirelessly at the Northwest Georgia Center for Independent Living in Rome, Georgia. This nonprofit organization assists individuals of all ages who have all types of disabilities and helps them reach their goals of living independently. They serve 15 counties, and the majority of the staff are people with disabilities. In her role as assistant director, Holtzclaw meets one-on-one with consumers in the community, collaborates with the office nursing home coordinator and other staff, works on the budget and finances, meets with the board of directors, and whatever else needs to be done. The core services of the Center are independent living skills training, information & referral, peer mentoring, self-advocacy, and transition

  • Traveling an Unfamiliar Route and Taking a Risk as a Person Who Is Blind or Visually Impaired
    by Shannon Carollo on 4/24/2018

    Suppose you’ve graduated your orientation and mobility lessons and you’ve successfully mastered a handful of routes. You can get from home to work and back, to Starbucks and back (because let’s face it, this route is perhaps the most vital), to the gym and back, and to the grocery store and back. You and the cane have found your rhythm; shorelining, well, it’s practically a breeze; and bus travel now only gives you a smidge of anxiety. You’ve made great strides. But now the guys at the office invite you to a new restaurant in town. You’re determined to get there independently. Are you up for the challenge? With the collection of orientation and mobility tools and skills under your beltbut please, if you haven’t received proper training in travel skills for those who

  • Job Applications Inquiring About a Driver’s License? Discriminatory—Here’s Why
    by Shannon Carollo on 4/17/2018

    Hello ma’am, are you hiring, one can ask relentlessly around town; 'Job opening in _______ field' one can type in the search bar and scour the web with more intensity than a private detective. When determined to find a position, the hunt is on for an assortment of job applications in hard copy and electronic format. As we then fill out form after form after form, it’s easy to spot similaritiesone of which is, Do you have reliable transportation, or worse, Do you have a valid driver’s license, even when driving is not an essential job function. While the former is arguably tolerable, the latter is arguably discriminatory. It’s a lose-lose for individuals who are blind or visually impaired. If yes is


Other Blogs From the American Foundation for the Blind


FamilyConnect: A Parent's Voice

This blog is for you—parents of children with visual impairments. We talk about what it's like to be a parent, how to advocate for your child, what new resources we've found, and much more. FamilyConnect also periodically invites experts in all different aspects of raising a visually impaired child to make themselves available to answer your questions.


Raising a Child Who Is Blind and...

I am the mother of three and my middle child, Eddie, is officially the "Special Needs Child." Here is my blog to share the joy and pain of having such a unique child.


VisionAware Blog

Timely news and interviews relating to vision loss, including the latest updates in medical research.


Visually Impaired: Now What?

Formerly known as the "Peer Perspectives Blog," we have renamed the blog to reflect the purpose more accurately. The posts are written by our team of peer advisors, many of whom are professionals in the field who are blind or visually impaired. The blog features solutions for living with visual impairment resulting from eye conditions such as macular degeneration, glaucoma, diabetic retinopathy, and retinitis pigmentosa. It includes posts about living independently, getting around, low vision, technology, cooking, and helpful products.